Country home that ‘inspired Wuthering Heights’ up for sale for £1 million

A stunning country home is currently up for sale – and it’s believed to have inspired the Bronte sisters.

Back in 1824, the literary siblings visited sought shelter at the location following the great Crow Hill Bog Burst, a mudslide caused by a huge thunderstorm.

Ponden Hall, near the village of Haworth, is said to have influenced Emily Bronte when she penned Wuthering Heights.

It’s grade two-listed building is eerily similar to Thrushcross Grange, which features in the gothic novel.

The eight bedroom dwelling is also similar to Wildfell Hall, which is the titular building in Anne Bronte’s best-selling story.

With all that history behind it, it’s no surprise that the sprawling house is up for sale for £1,000,000.

Julie, an English literature graduate and Bronte fan, fell in love with the property 22 years ago.

She purchased it after hearing about the house's famous connection – and loved the fact it still featured original bookshelves that were perused by the novelists.

She said: "It's incredible to think Emily would have sat here reading.

"We have a catalogue of the books that were here then and they probably influenced her.

"There were gothic novels and books on necromancy and dark magic."

Julie added: "I've always been fascinated by the Brontes and as soon as we saw it we had to buy it.

"It's a magical place in an incredible location. You can feel the presence of history in this house yet it's also very warm and welcoming."

Ponden Hall is currently operating as a B&B – and Bronte fans from around the world visit it.

It’s won awards for having Britain's most friendly B&B hosts and was listed in a Trip Advisor top ten most spectacular B&B's in Europe.

Julie said: "I've loved meeting people from all over the world, including a few famous people too.

"Almost everyone stays here because of the Bronte connection."

According to guests’ feedback, the most popular room at Ponden Hall is the Earnshaw room.

It features a tiny east gable window that’s very similar to Emily Bronte's description in Wuthering Heights.

In the spooky novel, Cathy's ghost scratches furiously at the glass trying to get in.

Julie says: "We think that Emily based that scene on this room because old documents relating to the house describe a box bed in a room across from the library and you can see where it was bolted to the wall by the window.

"It is just how it is described in Wuthering Heights. Plus the date plaque above the main entrance identifies the hall as being rebuilt in 1801 and Emily's story starts with that exact date."

Julie has had a replica box bed made for the room.

She said: "There is something about Emily that makes people very emotional. She is a complete enigma.

"People cannot work out how a woman who had a very sheltered background wrote this dysfunctional, violent, sexual, amazing novel."

While many are attracted to the history of the house, buyers will be pleased to know it has modern comforts too.

It has everything you need for comfortable living, while still preserving its characterful features like the original door, mullions, beams, library, staircases and fireplaces.

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