Meditating 5-year-old raises over $28K for Christmas toys to give homeless kids

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Peace on Earth and goodwill toward kids are kicking off in Brooklyn, thanks to a 5-year-old meditating humanitarian.

Mini meditation master Bond Hill raised more than $28,000 towards Christmas toys for less fortunate children of New York City by livestreaming his over 20-minute meditation Sunday. 

“I just didn’t want the kids to be sad on Christmas,” Bond told The Post. “It’s not fair that some kids get toys and other kids don’t.”

Bond has meditated every day since he was 18 months old, courtesy of his mom’s own devotion to Zen energy.

For his charitable meditation marathon, however, the precocious kindergartener quadrupled his normal mindfulness moments, going introspective for a full 24 minutes as a tribute to late Los Angeles Lakers’ #24, Kobe Bryant. 

“Kobe was really good,” Bond told The Post of his favorite NBA player. “And he meditated, too.”

Bond initially set out to amass a much more humble donation of $2,000 for the Coalition for the Homeless holiday toy drive through his GoFundMe campaign, but raised double that amount in just 24 hours.

With the support of his father, Treis Hill, 42, and mother, Sapphira, 45, Bond’s philanthropic efforts have garnered a whopping $28,509. 

“Our pride is through the roof,” Sapphira told The Post. “Just watching him complete the challenge showed us how far he’s willing to push himself to support a good cause. It was the first time he ever [meditated] that long. We were so amazed.”

Like many kids, Bond was busy building up a lengthy Christmas wish list — his featuring a basketball hoop, a race car, and a dirt bike — ahead of the holiday season. However, the tiny altruist’s demands for Santa were put on hold once he learned other children would not receive any gifts this year. 

“His Christmas wish list got long,” Treis said. “We said that was enough toys, especially when other kids don’t have toys.” 

Tapping into a level of selflessness far beyond his years, Bond asked his dad, “Why don’t I try to meditate for charity? I could try to do my longest time ever, 15 or 20 minutes.”

Thus began his journey to manifest money through mindfulness.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CJBQGkyBPG9/

Bond’s benevolence enabled the Coalition for the Homeless to gift toys to the 19,000 home-insecure children living in New York City shelters.

“Kids in shelters have already experienced the trauma and shame of becoming homeless,” said Sarah Murphy, director of development at the Coalition for the Homeless. “The toy drive feels like it means a little more this year in the face of the pandemic.

“When you think of a child sitting still for 20 minutes, let alone meditating, it’s pretty remarkable,” Murphy added. “It just shows the compassion of young people in our city.”

Bond and his parents plan to make mediating for charity an annual Christmas tradition. 

“Hopefully this will extend into the classrooms and into more people’s homes,” Sapphira told The Post. “So that at the end of the day, we can instill [the importance of meditation and giving back] into this generation. Then, our future looks a little bit brighter.”

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