Afghan interpreter is reunited with his wife after Mail campaign

Afghan interpreter is reunited with his wife after Mail campaign to allow battlefield heroes to settle in Britain

  • Afghan interpreter Toryali served with the UK Armed Forces against the Taliban
  • The 27-year-old stepped of a plane in Glasgow with his wife Raihana, 26
  • They were one of two couples reunited following a Home Office policy change
  • Toryali had spent more than three years working on the front lines in Helmand 

An afghan interpreter has become one of the first beneficiaries of the Daily Mail’s award-winning Betrayal of the Brave campaign.

Toryali, who served with the UK Armed Forces, dreamt for four painful years of bringing his wife to join him here in Britain, away from the threat of the Taliban’s gunmen.

Yesterday that dream came true when the 27-year-old walked off an Emirates plane at Glasgow with wife Raihana, 26.

They were one of two couples reunited yesterday following a Home Office policy change in response to our campaign.

A beaming Toryali said: ‘We are so excited to be finally able to begin our life in a country that is safe, free of the uncertainty that comes of not knowing if there is a bomb or bullet round the next corner. 

Toryali, who served with the UK Armed Forces, dreamt for four painful years of bringing his wife to join him here in Britain, away from the threat of the Taliban’s gunmen (file image)

‘I would like to thank the Daily Mail, the campaigners and the Government for making this possible.’

Toryali had spent more than three years on the front lines in Helmand.

He first set foot in the UK alone more than four years ago after being granted sanctuary from the Taliban. 

He did not bring his wife with him, which meant that under previous Home Office rules she was not allowed to join him later.

That changed when former home secretary Sajid Javid announced that Afghan interpreters could be reunited with their families without having to apply under restrictive immigration rules.

Toryali had spent more than three years on the front lines in Helmand. He first set foot in the UK alone more than four years ago after being granted sanctuary from the Taliban (file image)

Mohammed Hares, who worked for five years on the front lines and led the Sulha Network representing interpreters in the UK, said between 60 and 70 had applied for visas to bring loved ones here.

Welcoming the arrival of the first two wives he said: ‘I am so delighted to see those families unite again.’

Former Army officer Ed Aitken, who had pressed former immigration minister Caroline Nokes to ensure the reunification happened, said: ‘Explaining to her why she needed to change the policy was the easy bit.

‘It was the frustratingly slow bureaucracy of delivering that policy change which has caused such misery in the community to which we owe much better treatment.’ 

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