Al-Qaeda endorses killing anyone who insults Prophet Mohammed

Al-Qaeda says killing anyone who insults Prophet Mohammed ‘is the right of every Muslim’ and threatens President Macron over his vow to defend freedom of speech 

  • Emmanuel Macron sparked outrage among Muslims as he defended cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed 
  • A French teacher was beheaded last month after showing his class the controversial images 
  • Protesters gathered in Jakarta and Bangladesh to criticise Macron’s comments in the latest demonstrations 
  • Thousands burned effigies, chanted against Macron and called for a boycott of French products   

Al-Qaeda has announced that killing anyone who insults Prophet Mohammed ‘is the right of every Muslim’ before threatening French President Emmanuel Macron over his vow to defend freedom of speech.  

Last month Macron defended the publication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed on the grounds of freedom of speech, launching a campaign against Islamic radicalism and sparking fury across the Muslim world.

‘Killing anyone who insults the prophet is the right of each and every Muslim,’ the jihadist group, known by its French acronym AQMI, said in a statement.

Macron’s remarks came after beheading of French teacher Samuel Paty near Paris by a suspected jihadist, after Paty had shown his students cartoons of the prophet Mohammed during a lesson on freedom of expression.

That followed the re-publication of the controversial cartoons in September by satirical French weekly Charlie Hebdo.

Macron has vowed to defend freedom of speech, but anger has spread among Muslims worldwide, with many vowing to boycott French products.

In Dhaka, Bangladesh, at least 50,000 people gathered to protest against Emmanuel Macron after he defended cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed

Supporters and activists of the Hefazat-e-Islam Bangladesh, an Islamist political party, burn an effigy of French president Emmanuel Macron

A protester burns a poster of Macron outside the French Institute in Bandung, Indonesia, as outrage continues in the wake of his comments about depicting the Prophet Mohammed

‘The boycott is a duty but it is not enough,’ AQMI said in the statement.

It threatened to avenge Macron’s comments, describing the French president as ‘young and unexperienced, with a little brain’ and saying he had ‘insisted on offending the Prophet’. 

Protests against Emmanuel Macron have continued across the Muslim world in the wake of his comments over depictions of the Prophet Mohammed.

In Jakarta, more than 2,000 demonstrators wearing white Islamic robes gathered in front of the French embassy to express their outrage, and burned an effigy of the French President.

Meanwhile in Bangladesh, at least 50,000 people took part in the biggest demonstration yet over Macron’s remarks defending the controversial cartoons.

In Bangladesh, at least 50,000 people took part in the biggest demonstration yet over Macron’s remarks

In Jakarta, authorities blocked streets leading to the embassy where more than 1,000 police and soldiers were deployed

Muslims offer congregational prayers in front of a banner which depicts Macros as the devil in Jakarta

A rally which started at Bangladesh’s biggest mosque was stopped from getting close to the French embassy where security has been stepped up.

Police estimated some 50,000 people took part in the protest, which demanded a boycott of French products, while organisers said there were more than 100,000.

Protesters chanted ‘No defamation of the Prophet Mohammed’ and burned an effigy of the French leader.

Macron sparked protests across the Muslim world after the murder last month of teacher Samuel Paty – who had shown his class a cartoon of Mohammed – by saying France would never renounce its laws permitting blasphemous caricatures.

The third major anti-France demonstration in Bangladesh in the past week was called by Hefazat-i-Islami, one of the biggest radical Muslim political groups in the country of 160 million people.

Protesters burned a photo of Macron who they branded the real ‘terrorist’ after he spoke out in support of free speech and the freedom to publish images of Mohammed

On Saturday, Indonesian President Joko Widodo strongly condemned terrorist attacks in Paris and Nice as well as remarks by Macron

An Indonesian protester holds a placard which reads ‘Moslem isn’t terrorism’ after a string of attacks in France has sparked outrage

Members of the Hefazat-e-Islam Bangladesh gather during an anti-France protest at Baitul Mukarram Mosque as they march towards the French Embassy in Dhaka

The protesters chanted ‘God is Great’ and ‘Boycott French products’ as they marched against the French President

Banners and placards slammed Macron, and some protesters stomped on Macron posters in the blocked street

Protesters burned the French flag during the demonstrations near the French Embassy in Dhaka as they vented their anger against Macron

Many people came from towns outside Dhaka to take part in the rally.

Junaid Babunagaori, the firebrand deputy chief of Hezafat, called on Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina to move the Bangladesh parliament to condemn Macron.

‘I call on traders to throw away French products. I ask the UN to take stern action against France,’ he told the rally.

In Jakarta, authorities blocked streets leading to the embassy where more than 1,000 police and soldiers were deployed in and around the building barricaded with razor wire.

Protesters chanted ‘No defamation of the Prophet Mohammed’ and burned an effigy of the French leader

Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Surabaya, Makassar, Medan and Bandung

Protesters kick a photo showing the French President as thousands gathered to express their outrage at his comments

The protesters chanted ‘God is Great’ and ‘Boycott French products’ as they marched. Their banners and placards slammed Macron, and some protesters stomped on Macron posters in the blocked streets. 

Smaller protests also occurred in other Indonesian cities, including in Surabaya, Makassar, Medan and Bandung.

On Saturday, Indonesian President Joko Widodo strongly condemned terrorist attacks in Paris and Nice as well as remarks by Macron that were deemed offensive toward Islam and Muslims.

At a national memorial for a teacher who was beheaded near Paris last month, Macron said the teacher ‘was the victim of a conspiracy of stupidity, hate, lies … hate of the other … hate of what we profoundly are.’

Macron has been accused of spreading anti-Muslim sentiment while eulogizing the teacher beheaded last month

In France, murdered teacher Samuel Paty was honoured at schools across the country with a one minute silence as students returned after holiday

On Thursday morning, three people were knifed to death in a church in the southern city of Nice in another strike the government described as an act of ‘Islamist’ terror

Widodo said freedom of expression that tarnishes the honor, sanctity and sacredness of religious values and symbols could not be justified and must be stopped.

‘Linking religion with terrorist acts is a big mistake,’ Widodo said. ‘Terrorism is terrorism, terrorists are terrorists, terrorism has nothing to do with any religion.’

Macron has been accused of spreading anti-Muslim sentiment while eulogizing the teacher beheaded last month.

Protest organizer Slamet Ma´arif told the crowd, including members of the Islamic Defenders Front vigilante group, that Macron was being aggressively hostile to Islam and called for a boycott on French products.

‘It hurt us deeply and we demanded him to retract his words and apologizes to the Muslim communities all over the world,’ he said from a truck modified with loudspeakers.

The French Embassy said Macron made a distinction between Islam and militancy.

Protesters called for a boycott on French products in Jakarta as they gathered outside the French embassy

They branded Macron a ‘terrorist’ for his strong comments in the wake of a string of attacks in France

‘President Emmanuel Macron made it clear that there was no intention at all to generalize, and clearly distinguished between the majority of French Muslims and the militant, separatist minority that is hostile to the values of the French Republic,’ the embassy´s statement said.

In France, murdered teacher Samuel Paty was honoured at schools across the country with a one minute silence as students returned after holiday.  

Schoolchildren across France were to observe a minute of silence at 11am to remember the teacher, who was killed in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, outside Paris, on October 16 just as the holiday began.

Schools reopened on Monday with added security following the string of attacks.

On Thursday morning, three people were knifed to death in a church in the southern city of Nice in another strike the government described as an act of ‘Islamist’ terror.

Macron has vowed to defend the right to freedom of speech and that France will never renounce caricatures

There was furore in the Muslim word after the republication of cartoons of the prophet Mohammed in September by the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo

‘I know your emotion after the terrorist attacks, including one in front of a school against a teacher,’ Macron said in a message to pupils on his Snapchat, Instagram and Facebook social media channels.

‘Today, in class, you will pay homage to Samuel Paty. We will all think of him, you and your teachers,’ he said, adding: ‘The plan of terrorism is to manufacture hatred.’

Prosecutors say Paty was beheaded by an 18-year-old Chechen man, Abdullakh Anzorov, who was killed by police.

Prime Minister Jean Castex was also due to travel to Conflans-Sainte-Honorine to pay his respects to Paty alongside Education Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer.

The stabbing rampage in Nice is suspected to have been carried out by Brahim Issaoui

Schools in France reopened with the country at maximum terror alert and parents told not to linger at school gates after dropping off their children

Children walk past armed Operation Sentinelle soldiers stationed outside their school in Paris as schools reopened under added security

French Prime Minister Jean Castex and Education, Youth and Sports Minister Jean-Michel Blanquer attend a homage to slain teacher Samuel Paty

A minute’s silence was held in schools across France in memory to Mr Paty as schools were reopened on Monday amid tight security

Students and teachers gather at the Aragon secondary school in Muret in homage to the teacher who was beheaded by an attacker for showing pupils cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed in his civics class

Schools in France reopened with the country at maximum terror alert and parents told not to linger at school gates after dropping off their children.

The school where Paty taught at Conflans-Saint-Honorine reopened for teachers only. France’s prime minister minister, Jean Castex, arrived to lend support. Other schools throughout the country resumed as usual to both students and teachers.

Throughout the country, students will read the letter of Jean Jaures, a 19th century French thinker and politician, to instructors urging them to teach the country’s children to ‘know France, its geography and its history, its body and its soul.’  

Macron has vowed to defend the right to freedom of speech and that France will never renounce caricatures, after the furore created in the Muslim word by the republication of cartoons of the prophet Mohammed in September by the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo.

The stabbing rampage in Nice is suspected to have been carried out by Brahim Issaoui, a 21-year-old who arrived in Europe from Tunisia in September. He remains in serious condition in hospital after police shot him.

Charlie Hebdo republished the cartoons to mark the start of the trial of suspected accomplices in the 2015 massacre of its staff by Islamist gunmen. The trial was Sunday delayed for at least a week after three defendants tested positive for coronavirus.

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