Australia news LIVE: Energy debate remains in the spotlight; key senators want more time to scrutinise workplace reforms

Key posts

  • Voters back price caps to tackle rising energy bills
  • Crossbench senators declare sticking points with IR bill process
  • This morning’s headlines at a glance
  • 1 of 1

Voters back price caps to tackle rising energy bills

Eighty per cent of Australians support calls to put a price cap on power to ease pressure on energy bills as federal ministers consider the contentious move.

The price controls have gained much greater support than other measures to confront the higher bills forecast in last week’s federal budget, with 59 per cent in favour of paying taxpayer subsidies to households on low incomes.

The exclusive findings also show that more than one-third of voters believe Labor has broken its election promises to cut power bills and boost wages but a bigger group, 53 per cent, believes it is too soon to tell if the pledges have been dumped.

Treasurer Jim Chalmers yesterday cleared the ground for major intervention in the market by saying the government would impose a mandatory code of conduct on gas companies as a way to ease the pressure on prices.

More on this issue here.

Crossbench senators declare sticking points with IR bill process

The three senators who will decide the fate of the government’s contentious industrial relations bill say they don’t have enough time to scrutinise the wide-scale changes in the three weeks they have been given.

Escalating concern from crossbenchers over the bill comes as the government will seek to highlight the less controversial aspects of its proposed new laws, which include a ban on job ads that advertise pay rates below the minimum wage.

Crossbench senators Tammy Tyrrell, Jacqui Lambie and David Pocock, have reservations with the IR bill.Credit:Alex Ellinghausen


Crossbench MPs are joining business groups and the Coalition in voicing concern at proposals to force businesses into multi-employer bargaining and mandatory arbitration if they refuse a request by an employee for more flexible work arrangements.

Many are concerned the changes could give unions too much industrial power to negotiate pay deals across several companies at once and launch widespread industrial action.

Crossbench MPs are joining business groups and the Coalition in voicing concern at proposals to force businesses into multi-employer bargaining and mandatory arbitration if they refuse a request by an employee for more flexible work arrangements.

Many are concerned the changes could give unions too much industrial power to negotiate pay deals across several companies at once and launch widespread industrial action.

Read the full story here.

This morning’s headlines at a glance

Good morning and thanks for your company.

It’s Monday, October 31. I’m Broede Carmody and I’m back from Canberra to anchor our live coverage for the first half of the day.

Here’s what you need to know before we get started.

  • Eighty per cent of Australian voters support calls to put a price cap on power to ease the pressure on rising energy bills, according to new polling.
  • Speaking of energy, the Albanese government is eyeing a revenue boost from gas exporters.
  • An Australian is among the more than 150 people killed following a Halloween stampede in South Korea.
  • The three senators who will determine the fate of Labor’s signature industrial relations reforms say they don’t have enough time to scrutinise the legislation.
  • And in case you missed it over the weekend, four Australian wives of Islamic State fighters and their children arrived in Sydney as part of the government’s repatriation plan.
  • 1 of 1

Most Viewed in National

Source: Read Full Article