Britain will be hit by rain as warning is issued for thunderstorms

Summer washout: Britain will be lashed by torrential rain as Met Office issues warning for thunderstorms and flooding and temperatures plummet to 12C

  • The Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for heavy showers and thunder, leading to flooding across UK
  • Worst of the conditions may see up to 20mm of rain in one hour and up to 40mm of rain over a couple of hours
  • The yellow warning covers parts of England, Wales and Northern Ireland and lasts from midday until 23.59pm
  • The bleak weather warning has been extended until 6am on Sunday for parts of northern and eastern England

Britons are preparing for torrential downpours after the Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms across the UK and even predicted flooding in some areas this evening.

The worst of the conditions are expected to see around 20mm of rain in one hour and 30 to 40mm of rain over a few hours in a Met Office yellow weather warning covering the Midlands, the North, the South East, the South West of England, and Northern Ireland and Wales.

The bleak weather warning lasts from midday until 23.59pm on Saturday, while it has been extended until 6am on Sunday in areas in northern and eastern England as torrential downpours are expected to batter the national.

The Met Office has also warned of low risk flooding across areas with a yellow warning and also warned that thunderstorms could even be expected in other areas across the UK, as Cornwall was battered by heavy rain and stormy weather on Saturday morning. 

Despite the stormy weather, there have still been balmy temperatures of above 20C across the UK on Saturday, reaching highs of 22C in Altnaharra, Sutherland. 

But the temperatures are expected to plummet to between 12 and 15C overnight as the nation continues to be hit by a wet and windy August.

The weather is expected to turn brighter in southern and western England into Sunday morning, with hopes of a less drizzly end to the weekend.

The Met Office issued a yellow warning for heavy showers which could cause low risk flooding and travel disruption in England, Wales and Northern Ireland on Saturday. Pictured: Spectators at Women’s British Open golf championship

But Britons did not let the wet summer weather stop them from getting out and about, as some people sheltered from the downpours underneath umbrellas as they went for a punt on the River Cam in Cambridge on the wet Saturday morning

Although rain is the main concern, the Met Office said there was a chance of low risk flooding in areas which had been given a yellow weather warning as the torrential downpours are set to continue.

It comes amid unsettled weather which has persisted across the UK throughout August, with the weather service also naming its first storm of the summer – Storm Evert – last month. 

But Britons did not let the wet summer weather stop them from getting out and about, as some plucky beachgoers were seen swimming in the sea of Southsea beach in Hampshire, despite the windy weather. 

Meanwhile, other people sheltered from the downpours underneath umbrellas as they went for a punt on the River Cam in Cambridge on the wet Saturday morning. 

Elsewhere in Scotland, spectators of the third round of the Women’s British Open golf championship in Carnoustie huddled under umbrellas as they watched the players on the first green through the murky and rainy weather. 

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge predicted that up to 40mm of rain could hit parts of Northern Ireland and south-west England over 24 hours on Saturday, and the same amount in the northern Pennines on Sunday. 

Heavy downpours are likely in some places, with the Met Office predicting around 20mm of rain in one hour and 30 to 40mm of rain over the space of a few hours. Pictured: Pedestrians shelter under an umbrella in Wimbledon town centre

Britons did not let the wet summer weather stop them from getting out and about, as some plucky beachgoers were seen swimming in the sea of Southsea beach in Hampshire, despite the windy weather

The yellow warning covers the Midlands, the North, the South East, the South West of England, Northern Ireland and Wales and lasts from midday until 10pm on 23.59pm. Pictured: Person on Southsea beach in Hampshire

The Women’s British Open in Carnoustie will see rain and drizzle with 4mm of rain in total across Saturday afternoon, with some dry interludes, but they are set to escape without any hazardous weather or thunderstorms. 

The tournament kicked off on Thursday and the golfers expressed their excitement on Friday as the weather proved to make the playing conditions much more challenging.

Georgia Hall, the 2018 champion, said of the weather conditions: ‘I think it’s about time it got windy.

‘It’s proper links golf and that’s what people want to see and I think it makes golf much more interesting when there’s a lot of wind. So I’m quite excited to play in it.’ 

Hall, who won her favourite event three years ago at Royal Lytham, rolled in six birdies in her first 14 holes to move into a one-stroke lead on 9 under in an exciting Friday.   

The wet start to the weekend follows unsettled summer weather which has persisted across the UK throughout August.

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge said the City of London has had 117 per cent of its usual August rainfall already.

The summer downpours has seen 60mm of rain fall on the capital up to August 17, compared with 51mm usually seen over the entire month.

The bleak weather warning has been extended until 6am on Sunday for northern and eastern England, while the weather is set to turn brighter in southern and western England. Pictured: People shelter under umbrellas on Southsea beach

Although rain is the main concern, there is a chance of low risk flooding in areas with a yellow weather warning as the torrential downpours are set to continue. Pictured: Pedestrians are caught in a rain shower in Wimbledon town centre

It comes amid unsettled weather which has persisted across the UK throughout August, with the weather service naming its first storm of the summer last month. Pictured: People walk past a ‘Pompey against plastic trash’ sculpture on Southsea beach

Met Office meteorologist Simon Partridge predicted that up to 40mm of rain could hit parts of Northern Ireland and south-west England over 24 hours on Saturday. Pictured: People on the seafront near to Southsea beach in Hampshire

Northern Ireland has recorded 90mm of rain, which is a massive 90 per cent of its 97mm average for the month, with tens days of the month still remaining. 

Despite the soggy outlook, some experts insist there is still a chance for warmer temperatures while pressure builds in the south, meaning the mercury could reach 77F (25C) towards the end of the month.

The Met Office issued a yellow weather warning on Saturday

One forecaster admitted a heatwave is not on the cards, but urged Brits ‘not to give up hope altogether’ with some September’s having come up trumps over recent years. 

A spokesperson for the union said this year’s harvest was delayed due to cold spring temperatures, but its too early to say how much profits will be impacted and whether consumers could see a rise in food prices.

They said: ‘The localised heavy rain and hail has caused significant problems in certain areas.

‘It’s a mixed picture because for many areas they just haven’t had many clear dry days in a row to harvest, so things have been a bit ‘stop-start’ with harvesting.

‘A heatwave is not on the cards – but let’s not give up hope altogether. Some September’s have come up trumps over recent years.’ 

Meanwhile, Coral bookmakers are offering 6-4 for this month to be a record wet August. 

The firm’s John Hill said: ‘This summer has already been one of the wettest in recent memory and with more rain on the way, by the time it is up, it may be the wettest we have ever had.

‘Rainfall has been forecast to arrive in many parts of the UK over the weekend and as a result, the odds suggest there is a strong chance this month will end as a record wet August.’

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