London state school gets more pupils to Oxbridge than ETON

East London state school gets more pupils to Oxbridge than ETON: 55 students at inner city academy where majority of class are from BAME backgrounds got required A-levels compared to 48 at PM’s Alma Mater

  • Fifty-five teenagers at East London state school got the A-level grades needed for them to study at Oxbridge 
  • The majority of pupils at Newham’s Brampton Manor Academy are from BAME backgrounds 
  • At Eton College, where Prime Minister Boris Johnson studied, 48 pupils secured Oxbridge offers 
  • In total, nearly half – 44.8 per cent – of UK entries were awarded an A or A* grade this summer

Fifty-five teenagers at an East London state school today got the A-level grades needed for them to study at Oxbridge – seven more than the offers made to students at the prestigious Eton College.  

The majority of pupils at Newham’s Brampton Manor Academy are from ethnic minority backgrounds, in receipt of free school meals or will be the first in their family to attend university.

Sam Dobin, Brampton’s sixth form director, said he was ‘delighted’ that 55 of its students are now set to study at Oxford or Cambridge University this year – which is more than leading independent schools.

At Eton, the 581-year-old boarding school where British premiers including Boris Johnson, David Cameron and Winston Churchill studied, 48 pupils secured Oxbridge offers – a fall from 69 last year.

In all, 350 students took their A levels at the school this year with 330 getting into Russell Group universities, including the 55 who got into Oxbridge. In 2014, just one Brampton student received an offer for Oxbridge, but by last year this had risen to 51.

Brampton Manor Academy tweeted praise for high-flying students Kenny and Iyanuoluwa, who will be flying off to Harvard and Stanford Universities in the United States respectively on full scholarships after scoring top A-level grades.  

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results

Students Ade Olugboji (right) and Nyat Aron-Yohannes celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London

At Eton, the prestigious 581-year-old boarding school where British premiers including Boris Johnson, David Cameron and Winston Churchill studied, 48 pupils secured Oxbridge offers – a fall from 69 last year


Brampton Manor Academy tweeted praise for high-flying students Kenny (left) and Iyanuoluwa (right), who will be flying off to Harvard and Stanford Universities in the United States respectively on full scholarships after scoring top A-level grades

Student Amina Lounici, 18 (centre), celebrates with her friend at Brampton Manor Academy in London

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results


Left: Rachael Folorunsho, 18, at Brampton Manor Academy in London reacts after receiving her A-Level results at Brampton Manor Academy. Right: Susan Hope, 18, of Dagenham, Essex, who is going to study education at Cambridge with the hope of a career in child psychology at Brampton Manor Academy

In total, more than two in five, 44.8 per cent, of UK entries were awarded an A or A* grade this summer – up by 6.3 percentage points on last year when 38.5 per cent achieved the top grades, and one in five of all results was an A*, another record

Seventy per cent of private school students have been given an A* or A this year – compared to around 39 per cent for a non-selective comprehensive school

KEY STATISTICS IN THIS YEAR’S A-LEVEL RESULTS 

In total, more than two in five, 44.8 per cent, of UK entries were awarded an A or A* grade this summer – up by 6.3 percentage points on last year when 38.5 per cent achieved the top grades, and one in five of all results was an A*, another record

Here are the main figures in this year’s A-level results:

– The proportion of candidates receiving top grades is the highest on record. A total of 44.8 per cent of entrants were awarded either an A or A*, up from 38.5 per cent in 2020.

– Nearly one in five (19.1 per cent) entrants received an A*. This is another record high, and is up from around one in seven (14.3 per cent) last year.

– The overall pass rate (grades A* to E) was 99.5 per cent. This is down very slightly from 99.7 per cent in 2020.

– Some 88.5 per cent received a C or above, up from 88.0 per cent in 2020 and the highest since at least 2000.

– Girls have extended their lead over boys in the top grades. The proportion of girls who got A or higher was 46.9 per cent, 4.8 percentage points higher than boys (42.1 per cent). Last year, girls led boys by 3.2 percentage points (39.9 per cent girls, 36.7 per centboys). Boys briefly took the lead in 2017 and 2018, following a long period in which girls had been ahead.

– Girls have also extended their lead in the highest grade, A*. The proportion of girls who got A* was 19.7 per cent, 1.3 percentage points highest than boys (18.4 per cent). Last year the gap was just 0.2 points (14.4 per cent girls, 14.2 per cent boys).

– The most popular subject this year was maths. It was taken by 97,690 entrants, up 3.6 per cent on 2020.

– Psychology remains the second most popular subject. It was taken by 71,235 entrants, up 9.2 per cent on 2020. Biology was once again the third most popular subject, taken by 70,055 entrants, a rise of 7.6 per cent.

– Chinese saw the biggest percentage drop in candidates for a single subject with more than 1,000 entrants, falling by 18.9 per cent from 1,617 to 1,312.

– Geography saw the biggest percentage jump in candidates of any subject with more than 1,000 entrants, rising by 16.8 per cent from 30,203 to 35,268.

– There were 824,718 A-levels awarded, up 5.1 per cent on last year’s total (784,959).

Brampton Manor opened its sixth form in 2012 with the aim of transforming progression rates to Oxford, Cambridge and other elite Russell Group universities for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The oversubscribed selective sixth form accepts 300 to 400 students a year and some of them travel for as long as two hours each way to attend.

After a bout of excited screaming, hugs and hyperventilating, Nyat Aron-Yohannes said there was ‘black excellence in this building’ after hearing about how many of her classmates are now heading to Oxford or Cambridge.

The 18-year-old of Purfleet, Essex, who got three A*s and is going to Oxford to study philosophy, politics and economics, said ‘the struggle was real’.

She added: ‘We woke up early to come into school and sometimes it did not even seem like it was worth it at those times when the grades were not matching up to your work ethic.

‘Then lockdown happened and you had to persevere on your own because you did not have your classmates or teachers physically nearby to push you. You had to find strength somewhere else.

‘I am just grateful it paid off, we were walking in faith.’

She said she was happy for her relatives, particularly her father Abraham, adding: ‘I am the first in my family to go to Oxford.

‘My father told me this could be possible. His words were of motivation.’

Ade Olugboji, 18, of Purfleet, Essex, got four A*s and is going to study maths and philosophy at Oxford.

He said: ‘Brampton has a philosophy of hard work. I started at 6am and left at 6pm. I knew there was going to be work but I did not understand the level until I got here. The thing is once I saw everyone else working so hard and so well, it did not seem that it (success) was impossible.’

Kenny Ikeji, 18, of Dagenham, Essex, got the three A* grades he needed to study computer science at Harvard.

After picking up his grades, he said: ‘The feeling is good and seeing everyone happy as well is great because during the two years (of study) everyone was stressed out but on a day like this, it is as if all the hard work has paid off.

‘There are lots of people going to Oxford and Cambridge and I am not surprised because you would expect it when you see how hard everyone here works. Once they had their university offers, there was a new fire in them to study to make sure they got the grades to go.’

He described the school as a place where people do not let their inner city surroundings affect their hopes.

He said: ‘It is peer pressure because when everybody around you is studying, you see your friends getting better grades and then you want to get better grades. The teachers all push us and they make you want to do well so that you want to work. They do not force you to do it.’

Mr Dobin said the students had overcome a lot of disruption over the past two years but ‘they have kept incredibly determined, focused and motivated’.

He added: ‘The results today just demonstrate that they are being rewarded for the immense effort they have put in and the talent they have shown.’

Last summer, the fiasco around grading led to thousands of A-level students having their results downgraded from school estimates by a controversial algorithm, before Ofqual announced a U-turn. But this year, no algorithm will be used to moderate teachers’ grades. 

Gavin Williamson today defended this year’s record high A-level grades after it was revealed nearly half of this morning’s results were either A* or A – but the Education Secretary admitted there may still not be exams next year with teachers deciding the results again. 

In total, more than two in five, 44.8 per cent, of UK entries were awarded an A or A* grade this summer – up by 6.3 percentage points on last year when 38.5 per cent achieved the top grades, and one in five of all results was an A*, another record.

And according to an analysis by Ofqual, some 6.9 per cent of students in England were awarded three A*s this year – compared with 4.3 per cent in 2020 and 1.6 per cent in 2019, the last time they sat exams, as critics warned the education system had descended into the ‘wild west of grading’. 

It came as the total number of students accepted on to UK degree courses has risen five per cent on the same point last year, with 435,430 taking up places so far, initial Ucas figures show, but on the most popular courses up to a third of students may be rejected or have to go through clearing due to the number of people getting the required grades.  

Students Nana Arthur (left) and Kerena Arthur (right, unrelated) celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results

Students at Brampton Manor Academy in London queue nervously before receiving their A-Level results

Kairon Concepcion (centre) at Brampton Manor Academy in London, celebrates after receiving his A-Level results

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results

Fifty-five teenagers at an East London state school today got the A-level grades needed for them to study at Oxbridge 

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London


Left: Student Victoria Eingoff, 18, (left) celebrates with her mother Anna at Brampton Manor Academy. Right: Students Nana Arthur (left) and Kerena Arthur (right, unrelated) celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy


Left: Student Kenny Ikeji at Brampton Manor Academy after receiving his A-Level results. Right: Students at Brampton Manor Academy in London react after receiving their A-Level results

Student, 19, with cerebral palsy says she’s ‘in shock’ after receiving top marks 

Ellie Curran with her mother Margie at Archbishop Blanch School in Liverpool

Nineteen-year-old Ellie Curran, who has cerebral palsy, celebrated receiving an A* in sociology, a B in business and a distinction in BTEC law when she picked up her results at Archbishop Blanch School in Liverpool.

She said she was ‘in shock’ but very excited about going on to study criminology at Liverpool Hope University.

Miss Curran, who is also a keen wheelchair football player, said: ‘It’s been hard working from home and trying to get everything done.’

Her mother Margie said: ‘She’s very dedicated, in lockdown she would be up at 8am at her desk.

‘She’s always been dedicated, I think she just wants to prove everyone wrong and show she can do it.’

Student who suffered ‘life-threatening’ brain tumour achieved three A*s and now hopes to study at Cambridge 

Melos Krasniqi poses with his grades at Kensington Aldridge Academy in London

An A-level student who suffered a ‘life-threatening’ brain tumour battled back to achieve three A*s and now hopes to study at Cambridge University.

Melos Krasniqi celebrated with friends and family after seeing his ‘better than expected’ results in maths, physics and geography.

The 17-year-old, who studied at Kensington Aldridge Academy in west London, said he missed a few months in his first year after doctors discovered a tumour in his brain.

He told the PA news agency: ‘Midway through October in my first year I had a scan for some headaches and it turned out I wasn’t very well.

‘I had some complications in my brain and emailed the school to tell them what had happened. The teachers were so supportive.

‘I had two surgeries to resolve everything and they removed the tumour, which was life-threatening because it had been going on for some time.

‘The teachers recommended that I could skip the rest of the year and re-do Year 12 or do whatever I felt best.

‘I came back part-time a few months after my surgery and had catch-up sessions, which was obviously more work on top of the pandemic.’

Melos said he had no intention of missing a school year and, during his recovery, he asked his teachers for more work so he could catch up.

He now hopes to study engineering at Cambridge University.

It came as dozens of students poured into the school, near Grenfell Tower, on Tuesday morning to pick up their results.

Another Oxbridge hopeful, Leila Jarvis, 18, had tears in her eyes after seeing she had achieved three A*s and an A.

She said: ‘The past two years has definitely been challenging – you do kind of wonder what kind of grades you’ll get so it has been stressful.

‘But the school has been great, they’ve really rooted for us and given us a lot of help, especially as my time in this school has seen things like the Grenfell tragedy, which has made it really hard for the community.

‘I live right around the corner and obviously it’s had a big impact – everyone was impacted.

‘I now hope to go to Oxford University to study history and politics.’

Ahmed El-Bouhy, 18, achieved four A*s and will now study natural sciences at Cambridge University.

He said: ‘It’s been really stressful and, after last year with everyone’s issues with the grading system, I was slightly worried it could have been the same situation this year.

‘But I’m really happy and delighted with the results and look forward to going to university.’

Other students celebrating their results included one who will be the first in her family to attend university, while another is planning to join the RAF.

Nottingham students who received four A*s

Luisa McMahon, 18, of Wollaton, Nottingham, achieved four A*s in Maths, Further Maths, Geography and Psychology at Nottingham High School

Luisa McMahon, 18, of Wollaton, Nottingham, achieved four A*s in Maths, Further Maths, Geography and Psychology at Nottingham High School.

She said: ‘This year in particular has made me more anxious to get my results. We had loads of mini exams so as much as I worked for that, it’s still not the same as having one final end-of-year exam.

‘I am going to Loughborough University to do Maths and Sports Science. I am not sure what I want to do next, I am taking each step as it comes. I feel university will open more doors for me. 

‘My friends and family have congratulated me – everyone is really happy and relieved for me.

‘Nottingham High School always tends to do above average, around 45 per cent of my school got A*’s this year and 95 per cent got B’s and above.’

Razeen Surtee, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, got four A*s in Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths at Nottingham High School

Razeen Surtee, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, got four A*s in Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths at Nottingham High School.

He said: ‘Now I have my results, I am going to the London School of Economics to study PPE – Philosophy, Politics and Economics. Perhaps I would like a career in politics but I am keeping it open. 

‘This year, with lockdowns, it has been very different with the lack of time to prepare and being unsure about what was going to happen with the exams.

‘But with the support of family and friends you get through it and it has turned out okay in the end. My parents are very happy and teary. 

‘It is nice to get the stress off my shoulders now. It feels like my school has done really well, everyone I have spoken to seems really happy – all my friends have got into their universities.’

Tom Bedforth, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, achieved four A*’s in Religious Studies, Maths, Physics and Further Maths at Nottingham High School and will now go on to study at Oxford University

Tom Bedforth, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, achieved four A*’s in Religious Studies, Maths, Physics and Further Maths at Nottingham High School and will now go on to study at Oxford University.

He added: ‘I did very well, I’m really happy and pleased. My place is now confirmed to do Physics and Philosophy and Oxford University.

‘My friends and family knew how much these A-Levels meant to me, they are very pleased and relieved – mainly for my emotional state.

‘This year, for me, there has been an increase level of stress, just because normally I would have a set period of time to revise for a large final set of exams.

‘The uncertainty was stressful but it has all turned out well in the end. All any of us could do was just work as hard as we could. I feel very lucky. 

‘I am seeing a lot of happy people, my cohort seemed to be pleased with their results. I am now excited though for what is to come – if I do well in Physics, I’ll see if I can solve any big equations.’ 

Headteacher Nikki Clifton said of the three students on GB News: ‘They’re so brave, but they’re a credit to each and every youngster up and down, around the country and I couldn’t be happier for them.

‘Today’s a fabulous day, it’s one of my favourite days of the year and I think coming after the two years of disruption, I think I’m really looking forward to having a great day of fun and celebration with the students.’

Asked how she was feeling, Ms Clifton said: ‘I’m excited, a little bit nervous as I always am on these days because it is a nervous day and students are nervous. But I’m hopeful that our students will open a set of results that will give (sic) them where they want to go and I hope that is replicated up and down the country.’

She added: ‘It has been a very different and rigorous set of processes, and it’s very different to any other year. You can’t compare this set of year’s results with last year, we’ve got a completely different set of assessment parameters, a whole new policy, a whole different way of working for our students and our staff, and I couldn’t be prouder of them.’ 

Overall, the proportion of entries awarded the top A* grade this year has surged to 19.1 per cent – the highest proportion since the top grade was first introduced in 2010.

Girls performed better than boys at the top grades, and female maths students overtook boys for the first time in the number of A* grades achieved, figures for England, Wales and Northern Ireland show.

Luisa McMahon, 18, of Wollaton, Nottingham, achieved four A*’s in Maths, Further Maths, Geography and Psychology at Nottingham High School.

She said: ‘This year in particular has made me more anxious to get my results. We had loads of mini exams so as much as I worked for that, it’s still not the same as having one final end-of-year exam.

‘I am going to Loughborough University to do Maths and Sports Science. I am not sure what I want to do next, I am taking each step as it comes. I feel university will open more doors for me. My friends and family have congratulated me – everyone is really happy and relieved for me.

‘Nottingham High School always tends to do above average, around 45 per cent of my school got A*’s this year and 95 per cent got B’s and above.’

Razeen Surtee, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, got four A*’s in Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths at Nottingham High School.

He said: ‘Now I have my results, I am going to the London School of Economics to study PPE – Philosophy, Politics and Economics. Perhaps I would like a career in politics but I am keeping it open. This year, with lockdowns, it has been very different with the lack of time to prepare and being unsure about what was going to happen with the exams.

‘But with the support of family and friends you get through it and it has turned out okay in the end. My parents are very happy and teary. It is nice to get the stress off my shoulders now. It feels like my school has done really well, everyone I have spoken to seems really happy – all my friends have got into their universities.’

Tom Bedforth, 18, of West Bridgford, Nottingham, achieved four A*’s in Religious Studies, Maths, Physics and Further Maths at Nottingham High School and will now go on to study at Oxford University.

He added: ‘I did very well, I’m really happy and pleased. My place is now confirmed to do Physics and Philosophy and Oxford University.

‘My friends and family knew how much these A-Levels meant to me, they are very pleased and relieved – mainly for my emotional state.

‘This year, for me, there has been an increase level of stress, just because normally I would have a set period of time to revise for a large final set of exams.

‘The uncertainty was stressful but it has all turned out well in the end. All any of us could do was just work as hard as we could. I feel very lucky. I am seeing a lot of happy people, my cohort seemed to be pleased with their results. I am now excited though for what is to come – if I do well in Physics, I’ll see if I can solve any big equations.’ 

One sixth former – David White, 18, from Romford, east London- has won a place at one of Britain’s top universities despite only attending school for 63 days in the academic year after catching Covid twice in just six months. 

It meant he could only attend for just over nine weeks in his final year of A-level studies with schools also shut during the second lockdown.

David also missed huge chunks in his first year during the initial lockdown and says he has hardly been at school in the last two years for his A Level course

Today, he discovered he scored the top marks in his A-levels to confirm his place to study physics at King’s College London in September.

David credits staff at Drapers Academy in Harold Hill, near Romford, with keeping him on track.

He said: ‘It has been totally crazy getting Covid twice in the space of six months. I was not really ill either time, but I lost my sense of taste and smell the second time.

‘It was more the isolation and the time I had to take off school on top of all the time I had missed because of the lockdown.

‘The school has been incredible though. They have made sure I keep up with my studies by getting all students tablets and helping us digitally. That has kept me on the right track.

‘It has been a really difficult couple of years for all of us and the young people at schools have had it really hard.

‘I am so pleased to get into my first-choice university. I had hardly been in school. I’m proud of what I achieved but think I could have been even better in a normal year.’ 

David wasn’t the only person at the school to contract the virus twice. Head of Sixth Form, Lee Bryant, is still suffering from fatigue some 10 months after a second bout of Covid.

He said: ‘I was off from October to December and still need to use the lift rather than the stairs. I can say in the 32 years I have been teaching that this has been the most difficult.

‘Our staff have been excellent and the students on returning to class have hit the ground running after overcoming many hurdles and getting used to Zoom, internet. They have adapted so well.’

Despite a challenging year 80 per cent of Drapers Academy A-level students achieved grades A*-C with several off to top London universities.

Other high achievers at the school include Jorja Korosec, 18, of Romford, who will study History at Queen’s College, Cambridge.

She said: ‘I have to thank the school for their amazing support during what has been a tough year. I am so excited to be going to Cambridge.’

Drapers Academy principal Darren Luckhurst said: ‘I have been totally amazed by our students who have shown such resilience. Their determination to succeed is shown through the fruits of their labour.

‘I have some excellent staff here who put their heart into teaching and have taken on extra work as well as continuing to teach other school years.’

‘Many of our students have parents who work in the care sector or the NHS so we often help homeschool other family members and hold down part time jobs. They worked so hard to achieve their results.’

Evie Smith, 18, gained her place at university after combining her studies with playing for Liverpool women’s under-21s.

The Archbishop Blanch School pupil will be able to study sports science at Liverpool John Moores University after achieving a distinction star and distinction BTECs and a B at A-level.

She said the decision on whether she takes up the place could depend on whether she is offered a professional football contract.

She said: ‘I’m really happy. I’ve been playing for the under-21s for the past two seasons while I’ve been in sixth form. It’s difficult trying to balance my time but the club are really supportive with that.’

Pupils at an inner city state school are celebrating after 55 teenagers got the A-level grades needed for them to study at Oxbridge, which is more than the offers made to Eton College students.

The majority of pupils at Brampton Manor Academy in Newham, east London, are from ethnic minority backgrounds, in receipt of free school meals (FSMs), or will be the first in their family to attend university.

Sam Dobin, Brampton’s sixth form director, said he is ‘delighted’ that 55 of its students are now set to study at Oxford or Cambridge University this year, which is more than leading independent schools.

At Eton, where Boris Johnson studied, 48 pupils secured Oxbridge offers, a fall from 69 last year.

After a bout of excited screaming, hugs and hyperventilating, Nyat Aron-Yohannes said there was ‘black excellence in this building’ after hearing about how many of her classmates are now heading to Oxford or Cambridge.

The 18-year-old of Purfleet, Essex, who got three A*s and is going to Oxford to study philosophy, politics and economics, said ‘the struggle was real’.

She added: ‘We woke up early to come into school and sometimes it did not even seem like it was worth it at those times when the grades were not matching up to your work ethic.

‘Then lockdown happened and you had to persevere on your own because you did not have your classmates or teachers physically nearby to push you. You had to find strength somewhere else. I am just grateful it paid off, we were walking in faith.’

She said she was happy for her relatives, particularly her father Abraham, adding: ‘I am the first in my family to go to Oxford. My father told me this could be possible. His words were of motivation.’

Ade Olugboji, 18, of Purfleet, Essex, got four A*s and is going to study maths and philosophy at Oxford.

He said: ‘Brampton has a philosophy of hard work. I started at 6am and left at 6pm. I knew there was going to be work but I did not understand the level until I got here.

‘The thing is once I saw everyone else working so hard and so well, it did not seem that it (success) was impossible.’

In all, 350 students took their A levels at the school this year with 330 getting into Russell Group universities, including the 55 who got into Oxbridge.

In 2014, just one Brampton student received an offer for Oxbridge, but by last year this had risen to 51.

Brampton Manor opened its sixth form in 2012 with the aim of transforming progression rates to Oxford, Cambridge and other elite Russell Group universities for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The oversubscribed selective sixth form accepts 300 to 400 students a year and some of them travel for as long as two hours each way to attend. Kenny Ikeji, 18, of Dagenham, east London, got the three A* grades he needed to study computer science at Harvard.

After picking up his grades, he said: ‘The feeling is good and seeing everyone happy as well is great because during the two years (of study) everyone was stressed out but on a day like this, it is as if all the hard work has paid off.

‘There are lots of people going to Oxford and Cambridge and I am not surprised because you would expect it when you see how hard everyone here works. Once they had their university offers, there was a new fire in them to study to make sure they got the grades to go.’

He described the school as a place where people do not let their inner city surroundings affect their hopes.

He said: ‘It is peer pressure because when everybody around you is studying, you see your friends getting better grades and then you want to get better grades. The teachers all push us and they make you want to do well so that you want to work. They do not force you to do it.’

Susan Hope, 18, also from Dagenham, is going to study education at Cambridge with the aim of a career in child psychology. She said: ‘I did not want to apply (to Cambridge) because of the fear of me getting rejected, but coming here made me think ‘If they can do it, then why can’t I?’

‘Coming from this area you do not see that many people going to university at all, but if you take that chance, work hard and you can achieve anything – that is what Brampton teaches us.

‘I came here expecting to have to work hard, and I think that is just the work ethic the school instils in us. We are all willing to work for it and we are in a support system that just nudges us a bit further to achieve those dreams that we are all pretty much capable of.’ 


Left: Head girl Charlotte Maxwell at Regent House School & Preparatory Dept. in Newtownards. Right: Laily Tuhill smiles after opening her A Level results at Ffynone House


Left: Students at Archbishop Blanch School in Liverpool, receive their A-Level results. Right: Emelia Ambrose hugs a friend after opening her A Level results at Ffynone House school on August 10, 2021 in Swansea

Students receive their A-level results on August 10, 2021 in London

Students receive their A-level results on August 10, 2021 in London

Faith Bryant (left) and Abbie Hollis at Archbishop Blanch School in Liverpool, as students receive their A-Level results

Students at Nottingham High School get their A level results today

Leila Jarvis hugs her mother (name not given) after receiving her grades at Kensington Aldridge Academy in London, as students receive their A-Level results

Students at Nottingham High School get their A level results today

Students at Nottingham High School get their A level results today

Scenes of joy at Newcastle High School For Girls as pupils receive their A Level results this morning

Shalayna Morton reacts as she finds out her A-level results at the London Academy of Excellence Tottenham (LAET) in north London

Scenes of joy at Newcastle High School For Girls as pupils receive their A Level results this morning

Lulu Sorano, 18, with her mother Tracey (left) at Peter Symonds College in Winchester, Hampshire, as students receive their A-Level results

Fatima Al-Kinani (Left) and Maram Al Dandal at Kensington Aldridge Academy in London

Students celebrate at Brampton Manor Academy in London, as they receive their A-Level results

Ayomide Olumade (L) with Segal Kumar (R), after they received their results at Peter Seymonds College, Winchester

Shy schoolgirl, 18, got top grades to become a doctor after building her confidence by working at a ‘Del Boy’ market stall 

Mia Goddard, 18, plucked up the courage to start working on a market stall when she was just 14-years-old

A shy schoolgirl got top grades to become a doctor after building her confidence – by working at a ‘Del Boy’ market stall.

Mia Goddard, 18, plucked up the courage to start working on a market stall when she was just 14-years-old.

She spent the next two years speaking to passers-by – and was inspired to help her lonely customers by becoming a doctor.

Mia has now picked up A* grades in biology, chemistry and maths at A level following her years working at Cardiff Market.

She is now set to study at Cardiff University School of Medicine after leaving her Saturday job on the haberdashery stall.

Mia said: ‘Working at Cardiff Market for two years propelled me to do medicine,’ she said. It was a people facing job which gave me a lot of skills and I met a lot of different people.

‘Some people would come to the stall telling you they felt isolated or lonely and talking to them and seeing those scenarios has given me more empathy.

‘Most of the conditions I saw were things like mental health, people with learning difficulties and people who were lonely.

‘We had some elderly customers and some with Alzheimer’s who came with their carers, some people just came to talk. That was a big part of my decision to do medicine, I knew I wanted to work with people and it helped give me those skills.’

Mia got her grades after getting a full scholarship to take A levels at Cardiff Sixth Form College.

The keen runner, who ran for Wales under-17s in cross country, said it had been strange studying for A levels during the pandemic.

She added: ‘Our lessons continued online at the college but it was hard working from home and being isolated from friends and not able to go out.’

Nana Arthur, 18, of Rainham, east London, who is heading to Cambridge University to study philosophy, said: ‘We are disadvantaged people and this school gave us a way to move up.

‘To be honest, as soon as you come into this school you can’t not succeed – it is quite infectious.’

Her friend, Kerena Arthur, of Dalston, east London, also 18, is going to Oxford to study politics, philosophy and economics after getting three A*s.

She said: ‘I am very, very pleased. I was not expecting it at all and struggled a lot but I worked hard. It is crazy.

‘If you are slacking, your friends will tell you. You were not on your own. It was very much like a family in terms of the way people pushed each other. I can’t lie, the teachers push you as well and, if you are slacking, you will know about it.’

Romero Featherstone, 18, of Plaistow, east London, said he was ‘a little’ surprised but pleased after he got the three A* grades which will take him to Cambridge to study chemical engineering.

He said: ‘The school prepares you well. The school regularly get people into Oxbridge, so going here meant that I thought I had a good chance.’ 

Mr Dobin said the students had overcome a lot of disruption over the past two years but ‘they have kept incredibly determined, focused and motivated’.

He added: ‘The results today just demonstrate that they are being rewarded for the immense effort they have put in and the talent they have shown.’

Paul Vicars, Headteacher of Birkenhead School said: ‘The results are great but students are far more than academic results on a piece of paper. 

‘I’m immensely proud of all the students and I think they’ve probably worked harder for these results than any other cohort before them because of the pandemic. 

‘It’s difficult not to get emotional seeing everyone coming to collect their results, knowing what they’ve achieved and the challenges they have overcome; these days are always impactful to watch as a teacher because you want the students to be rewarded for their efforts and they certainly have been.’ 

Chloe Byers, 18, got three A*s to study Biochemistry at University of Bath. She said: ‘I can’t believe it, I was not expecting those results, it’s an incredible surprise. 

‘It’s been hard because when you’re in school you’ll see your mates at break time or you can turn to someone next to you in class if you don’t understand something. 

‘The girls have been great at keeping in touch with each other though, we have set up group FaceTime sessions on the weekends and done quiz nights so we didn’t feel like we lost touch.

Her mother Ruth said: ‘We’ve both been in tears, I couldn’t be any more proud of Chloe because she has just taken everything in her stride. She was a new student at the sixth form and then went into lockdown so she’s really been up against it. 

‘I think she would have been happy with three As but she ended up with three A*s and you could see how delighted we were it was written all over our faces. I’m a single mum and Chloe and I are very close but the lockdown definitely brought us closer.   

‘We converted the spare room into her office so she had a space to work without it feeling like schoolwork had taken over her home. I’m just so overwhelmed to come here today and see that all her hard work has been worth it.’

Head girl, Lizzie Hyatt, 18, got three A*s and an A to study General Engineering at University of Durham. She said: ‘I think not seeing my friends and having that social interaction has been the hardest part. Coming into school and seeing my friends really helped to motivate me so within a month of sitting and doing online learning at home constantly my motivation just wasn’t there anymore. 

‘I still felt like the quality of learning that we were getting online was great from the school, we could still speak to teachers whenever we needed and they were in touch with us everyday but it was just hard not having the support network of friends around you. 

‘But to come and get these results today and see everybody without having to socially distance is so special. It feels amazing just to be able to hug my friends and celebrate with them finally.’ 

Head boy, Archie Parker-Goff, 18, got four A*s to study Economics at University of Bristol. He said: ‘It’s definitely been more intense doing A-levels through lockdown. 

‘The learning style was a lot more independent and there were definitely days when you would wake up and couldn’t be bothered and it was really hard to get motivated. 

Polish teenager who couldn’t speak English when he arrived in Britain is off to Cambridge after achieving three A*s 

Milosz Kowalski poses with his grades at Peter Symonds College in Winchester, Hampshire

A Polish teenager who couldn’t speak English when he arrived in Britain ‘with nothing’ has earned himself a place at Cambridge University after achieving three A* grades in his A Levels.

Milosz Kowalski achieved the top grades in history, French and sociology – as well as an another A* in his extended project – and will now go on to study Human Social and Political Sciences at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge.

The determined 18 year old graduated from Peter Symonds College in Winchester, Hants, after a tumultuous journey for his family who moved from Poland 14 years ago ‘without even cutlery to put on the table’.

Now ‘proud’ Milosz, who lives in Southampton, Hants, and plans to work as a sociologist or in politics, says family in his native Poland are in ‘disbelief’ at his achievement.

He said: ‘It’s a huge achievement coming from an immigrant origin and getting into Cambridge. I feel very proud of myself.

‘My family were shocked, surprised and completely amazed – especially those still living in Poland. They were just in disbelief.

‘It’s been a very special process. When I came to college in 2019 I never though any of this would have have happened.

‘I wouldn’t say it helped, but lockdowns gave me the opportunity to really focus on my studies.

‘I also didn’t have to commute the two and a half hours to college on the train each day, which meant I was able to rest and revise more.

‘The bad side was not having as much support, and it was more difficult to motivate myself.

‘A lot of the time I was quite upset with the long commutes and lockdowns, but it all feels worth it now.’

Milosz, who lives with his mother, grandmother and 16 year old brother, said it felt ‘special’ to have come from an immigrant background and be accepted at one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

‘I was born in Poland and lived there for the first three or four years of my life, then I moved here with my mother moved in around 2007,’ he said.

‘I do remember going to primary school and not speaking a word of English, which is so bizarre when I look back, but I learned the language quickly.

‘We moved here for various reasons – economic reasons but also just to have a better life as well.

‘To come here as we did with not even any cutlery on the table and to get there is a big development.

‘We came here with nothing. It was difficult getting started up; building a life here… especially seeing as my mum is a single mother to me and my younger brother Jakub.

‘Now it is better, but then it was quite an industrious life, building everything from scratch, getting a house.’

Milosz said he was going to claim a free Nando’s, with the chain offering free food for students collecting results, with college friends he has hardly been able to see until recently.

He added: ‘We’re doing a belated birthday party with everyone who had their birthdays during lockdown.

‘I didn’t see any friends for months on end during lockdowns, especially because my grandmother who lives with us is vulnerable, so I was even more restricted.

‘I think the main thing is to celebrate what we have done during the pandemic. Me and my friends supported each other a lot and celebrating everything we have achieved needs to be celebrated.’

He now has his sights set on a career as a sociologist – though he admits politics could also be on the cards as a career option.

He said: ‘I want to become a sociologist, researching society for a research institution. I only recently discovered my passion for sociology whilst doing my extended project.

‘Politics is also an option – I’m a bit wary because it’s often toxic, but I would definitely consider it.

‘I’m excited to start university in October. I’m looking forward to a fresh start.

‘These past two years have been difficult, so I’m looking forward to a more normal experience at Cambridge.

‘Obviously it will be difficult, but I am optimistic – especially after the pandemic.’

 

‘But the teachers and the school have been amazing with their support and I was moving around different rooms in the house just to change the scene when I was studying. I spent a lot of time between home and visiting my grandma as well and it’s been lovely to come and collect my results with her because she’s so proud.’ 

His grandmother Sarah Parker said: ‘I’m very proud of him. We are quite an upbeat family and we laugh a lot but it has been worrying at times how the lockdown might affect them and you feel really sorry for them because they can’t go out and see their friends for a bit of light relief. But to come with him today and share this moment as he opened these results has been wonderful.’

But critics are concerned that middle class parents with ‘sharp elbows’ might have the upper hand when it comes for appeals, with the ‘have nots’ suffering disproportionately this year because they are more likely to be marked down and not appeal their results.

Robert Halfon, Tory chairman of the education select committee, said: ‘There’s likely to be grade inflation. The Government has got to make sure the appeals system is fair and easy to engage in and not just accessible to those with barristers for parents.’

Writing in the Telegraph, Mr Williamson said: ‘Because of the extraordinary conditions we have faced as a country, we announced in January that exams would not go ahead this year – it would have been unfair on students who had already given up so much in the battle against coronavirus. 

‘Their hard work, however, deserves to be rewarded with a qualification. We must support these students in looking to the future, because their whole lives are in front of them.’  

Asked on Sky News what the contingency plans are for next year’s exams, Mr Williamson said: ‘In the last academic year we have conducted an extensive consultation as we move back to examinations, and in a few weeks’ time as we go back into the winter period we will be doing another extensive consultation as to the contingency, which will be largely based around teacher-assessed grades, but we very much hope that we will be moving to a system of where we are able to move into the more normal pattern of examinations from next year, but always conscious that this pandemic, we have not always been able to predict the course of it, it has continuously changed, and it’s absolutely right that we have contingencies there, as we always do.’

Asked if he was ruling out teacher assessments for this time next year, he said: ‘What we are saying is you will probably have seen our consultation in the last academic year, we are very much planning to move back to examinations as a form of assessment, but we always have to have a contingency plan in place, and that’s why we will be consulting in the next academic year on those plans.’

Mr Williamson has said ’employers can have real confidence’ in the grades awarded to pupils.

Speaking to Sky News, he said: ‘This is a culmination of 13 years in education, I think we should be incredibly proud of their achievements, incredibly proud of the grades that they achieve.’

He said: ‘We do have a rigorous system of grading and awarding. People have been awarded this grade on the basis of evidence.

‘We took a difficult decision, and that decision was children were to be assessed on what they had been taught. We have seen various amounts of disruption around the country and children’s experiences have been different.

‘But still, you have a very clear grading system, you still see children who are achieving A*s, As, Bs, Cs, have really achieved so very, very much, and I think employers can have real confidence in the grades that they get. Let’s not forget this is an unprecedented year.’

This year, teachers in England submitted their decisions on pupils’ grades after drawing on a range of evidence, including mock exams, coursework, and in-class assessments using questions by exam boards.

Dr Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union, said: ‘Parents should be really warned not to hire lawyers to make the case for a different grade because it will impress no one, it won’t impress the exam boards.’  

She added: ‘Dressing up an appeal in legal language is not going to bolster that appeal, or make it more likely to succeed. So if you don’t want to waste your money, don’t do that.’

Paul Whiteman, general secretary of school leaders’ union NAHT, said: ‘There is certainly a worry that we are going to face more appeals than normal, but we just don’t know yet. 

‘Although the appeal system is there to bring a further level of confidence, spurious appeals or hopeful appeals will probably be a waste of time because the system that’s been brought in is a robust system for this year.’

He added: ‘My only appeal to students and students’ parents is that a lot of work has gone into this assessment, you should be able to rely upon the assessment so simply putting an appeal in for the sake of appealing in the hope that your grade might move would be the wrong thing to do.’ 

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said ‘legal firms turning themselves into ambulance chasers and saying to parents for a certain fee they will run an appeal’ was unhelpful.

He said: ‘That seems to me incredibly misguided because appeals are there for anyone who wants to use them, but they’re based on two things: did the school follow due process, and was the grade awarded a fair grade. That will be down to the awarding organisation.

‘If you’ve got a concern then the process is there, but you really don’t need to be sending money to lawyers.’ 

The Department for Education has said all A-level grades have been checked by schools as part of a quality assurance (QA) process – and one in five schools had a sample of their grades checked by exam boards.

Last summer, the fiasco around grading led to thousands of A-level students having their results downgraded from school estimates by a controversial algorithm before Ofqual announced a U-turn.

This year there will not be an algorithm used to moderate grades. Nick Hillman, director of the Higher Education Policy Institute (Hepi), said it could be more difficult to get on to a top course this year if grades are missed. 

‘It could be harder to get in than usual if you fall a grade or two behind your offer and if it is a competitive course,’ he said. ‘My advice would be to act swiftly if you need to find a place somewhere else.’

An analysis conducted by PA Media suggests that the day before results were due to be released, for applicants living in England, there were more than 26,000 courses with availability.

It shows that, as of Monday afternoon, 14 of the 24 Russell Group universities had vacancies on courses for English residents – around 2,390 courses between them – on the Ucas clearing site. The numbers of courses listed change frequently as different courses are filled, or become available.

At the same point last year, the day before results day, 17 of the Russell Group institutions had around 4,485 undergraduate courses listed on clearing with potential availability for students in England.

Last week, the head of the admissions service warned that clearing is likely to be ‘more competitive’ for students seeking places at selective universities this year due to uncertainty on teacher-assessed grades. 


Left: Georgia Davies laughs after opening her A Level results at Ffynone House school on August 10, 2021 in Swansea. Right: Lanre Dada poses with his grades at Kensington Aldridge Academy in London, as students receive their A-Level results

A student is congratulated by her mother after receiving her A-level exam results at Kingsdale Foundation school in London

Milosz Kowalski, Natasha Pell (centre) and Millie Smith, pose with their grades at Peter Symonds College in Winchester, Hampshire

Student Amina Lounici, 18 (centre), celebrates with her friend at Brampton Manor Academy in London

Students at Archbishop Blanch School in Liverpool, receive their A-Level results

Students at Nottingham High School get their A level results today

HOW WILL EXAM RESULTS BE DECIDED AND HOW CAN STUDENTS APPEAL? 

When will pupils receive their A-level and GCSE results?

Students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland will receive their A-level and GCSE results this week.

A-level and AS level results day is Tuesday, August 10 and GCSE results day is Thursday, August 12.

Pupils should check with their school or college whether they are still required to pick up their results in person in the morning, or whether they will be sent out by email or post instead.

The Scottish Highers results are also being released on A-level results day.

How have the grades been decided this year?

All four nations – England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland – adopted a system of awarding grades this summer based on teacher based assessment.

Teachers in England have been required to consider a range of evidence, including mock exams, coursework, and in-class assessments using questions by exam boards, to make decisions on pupils’ grades.

Headteachers had to submit a personal declaration that they believed grades to be accurate.

Schools and colleges were asked to provide samples of student work to exam boards, as well as evidence used to determine the grades for the students selected, as part of quality assurance (QA) checks.

Random and targeted sample checks of evidence were also carried out after grades were submitted.

In some cases, where the evidence did not support the grades submitted, schools and colleges have been asked to review their grades.

Last summer, the fiasco around grading led to thousands of A-level students having their results downgraded from school estimates by a controversial algorithm, before Ofqual announced a U-turn.

But this year, no algorithm will be used to moderate teachers’ grades.

What should students do if they are unhappy with their final grades?

Pupils in England who want to appeal against their grade must first request that their school or college reviews whether an administrative or procedural error was made.

Each school or college will set their own deadlines by which students must ask them to review a grade.

If the school or college rules no error was made, then students can escalate the appeal to the exam boards, which their school or college is expected to submit on their behalf.

In England, the deadline to send an appeal to the exam board is September 17.

There is an earlier deadline of August 23 for priority appeals, for example, if a student has not got their first choice of university place confirmed.

Can students sit an exam if they do not like their results?

Students in England who are unhappy with their A-level or GCSE grades will have the opportunity to take exams in the autumn.

AS and A-level exams will be held in October, while GCSE exams will take place in November and December.

The higher grade will count for applicants who wish to take an autumn exam.

What is the plan for the summer exams in 2022?

In England, ministers hope that exams will go ahead in summer 2022 after two years of cancelled exams.

But pupils taking GCSE and A-level exams next year could be given advance notice on the focus of exam papers to ensure they are not disadvantaged as a result of lost learning during the pandemic.

The proposals include giving schools and colleges some choice over the topics that students are assessed on, as well as providing exam aids, but final details will not be confirmed until the autumn term.

Clare Marchant, Ucas’s chief executive, urged students receiving their grades to make a decision ‘in a matter of days’ rather than waiting weeks.

But she added: ‘On Tuesday, I am expecting to wake up and have record numbers with their first choice.’ 

Last week, the Medical Schools Council, which represents 44 heads of medical schools across the UK, warned that some schools may still struggle to increase the number of students they admit despite the announcement that medicine and dentistry schools will receive funding to expand courses. 

Students who want to study medicine will have the option to defer their places until next year or choose to move to a different medical school amid capacity constraints, the MSC said.

Last night, Ofqual’s interim chief regulator Simon Lebus said that traditional tests only provided a ‘snapshot’ of a pupil’s ability and the new system allowed a fairer assessment gauged over a longer time period. 

Speaking to the BBC, Mr Lebus admitted that grades may be slightly higher this year, adding: ‘I think a good way to think of it is exams are a bit like a snapshot, a photograph – you capture an instant, it’s a form of sampling.

‘Whereas teacher assessment, it allows teachers to observe student performance over a much longer period, in a rather more complex way, taking into account lots of different pieces of work and arriving at a holistic judgment. 

‘I think, from that point of view, we can feel satisfied that it’s likely to give a much more accurate and substantial reflection of what their students are capable of achieving.’  

Ms Bousted told the Times: ‘I think there was a political decision to put teachers in the firing line. We think there will be a rise in the top grades but I’ve been assured by government that they won’t say teachers have been too generous.’ 

Mr Lebus said that the watchdog wanted to create a system where every student was given a fair chance to show what they can do. 

‘I’m very confident that, when they get their grades on Tuesday and Thursday this week, they’ll be able to feel satisfied that that’s happened,’ he told the broadcaster. 

Mr Lebus said there have been three stages of checks to ensure students can feel they have been ‘fairly treated’, including Ofqual checking the policies that schools have for awarding grades and exam boards looking over them.

Headteachers had to submit a personal declaration that they believed grades to be accurate. Schools and colleges were asked to provide samples of student work to exam boards, as well as evidence used to determine the grades for the students selected, as part of quality assurance (QA) checks. 

It comes as Tory peer Lord Lucas predicted that private school pupils will get short shrift in admissions because universities are prioritising the disadvantaged.  

The editor of the Good Schools Guide said yesterday that institutes will be ‘pretty cautious’ about giving places to fee-paying youngsters who missed their grades as they had ‘all the chances’ to succeed. 

Instead, they will give leg-ups to pupils who experienced ‘challenges’ such as having ‘nowhere to work’ during lockdown. 

But despite alleged grade inflation, individual pupils could lose out and there is likely to be variability between schools.  

Last night, Ofqual defended the system, claiming the results are ‘more accurate’ than if exams had been held mid-pandemic.

The Prime Minister’s spokesman said: ‘Students have worked incredibly hard during an extremely challenging time. We know exams are the fairest form of assessment but in their absence this year there is no one better placed to judge their abilities than their teachers.’

Suggestions that almost half of today’s grades will be an A or A* were reported in the Times. 

Mr Williamson wrote to all teachers, thanking them for their ‘hard work’ on grading. The Association of School and College Leaders stressed that qualifications had not been ‘devalued’.

Lord Lucas said anyone not getting the grades they need for university should call the admissions tutor. But he said that ‘tutors will say the hardest time has been had by state schools but by and large, independent schools have got through Covid pretty well’. 

He added that institutes will be ‘pretty cautious about giving extra space to someone from an independent school’ as ‘they’ve had all the chances’ to succeed.

‘I think admissions tutors will say the hardest time has been had by state schools but by and large, independent schools have got through Covid pretty well,’ he said. ‘They haven’t had half the challenges of someone else who has nowhere to work, or doesn’t have an online connection.’

Kate Green, Labour’s shadow education secretary, said: ‘Students have worked incredibly hard in extraordinary circumstances and should be proud of the results they are receiving today. They have done this in spite of a Conservative government which has let them down at every turn and shown no ambition for their futures.’

It came after Sir Keir Starmer warned that ‘chaos and incompetence’ in Government had created extra stress for those awaiting their results.

The Labour leader said Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Mr Williamson had failed to act early enough to ensure this summer’s results operations run smoothly.

‘It frustrates me immensely that this week’s big moment in so many young people’s lives is being risked by the chaos and incompetence at the top of this Government,’ he said. 

The Department for Education said it recognises the ‘unprecedented challenges pupils and students have faced’ during the pandemic and that a ‘rigorous system to ensure grades are fair’ has been put in place. 

Identical twins who racked up seven As, Long Covid sufferer who scored three A*s and the Great Britain water polo player off to study Geography at Manchester: Just some of the thousands of delighted students who gained top A-level results today

ROEDEAN SCHOOL

Identical twins Eloise and Jemima Goddard

The twins achieved seven As and one A* between them and are thrilled to be going to their first choice universities.

However they will not be studying together as Eloise, who got As in Politics, French and her EPQ an A* in Latin is going to Edinburgh University next month to study Politics while Jemima got A’s on Geography, French, Latin and her EPQ will go to Newcastle the following year after a gap year in Costa Rica and South America which will include a stint working at a sustainable hotel.

Eloise said: ‘I’m really thrilled to get the results I needed. It’s been a difficult year but we’ve had a huge amount of support from the school.’

Identical twins Eloise (left) and Jemima Goddard achieved seven As and one A* between them and are thrilled to be going to their first choice universities

FOUR OXBRIDGE GIRLS

Roedean headgirl Eden Wolfe-Naughton

For Eden her final year at the school has been fraught after she caught Covid-19 on December and then developed long Covid.

Fatigue and sickness left her unable to study for long periods she found it extremely difficult.

She said: ‘I tested positive for Covid on December 18 and haven’t been able to return to school since then but Roedean worked incredibly hard to evidence my grades with assessments and I was allowed to finish my coursework and EPQ at home but due to fatigue, brain fog and all sorts of physical symptoms it’s been crazy.

‘I was a really fit and active person so to be hit in this way has been very hard but I’m delighted with the results.’

Despite her physical problems she scored A*s in Biology, History, Spanish and her EPQ and after taking a gap year she aims to go on to study History at Cambridge.

Roedean headgirl Eden Wolfe-Naughton scored A*s in Biology, History, Spanish and her EPQ and after taking a gap year she aims to go on to study History at Cambridge

Eliza Cane-Honeysett

Achieved A*s in History and Philosophy and Ethics and A’s in Psychology and her EPQ and is going to study Anglo-Saxon and Celtic Studies at Cambridge.

‘I found studying under Covid quite difficult to adjust to at first but the school has been very well prepared and accommodating for pupils and they have been very supportive so that has helped enormously.

‘Anglo-Saxon studies is one of my great passions so I’m pleased to be able to go and study it.

Genevieve Howell Got four A*s in History, Latin, Maths and Further Maths and an A* in her EPQ and is going on to study law at Oxford.

She said the year has been difficult but she feels most pupils had coped well with the chances

She said: ‘I think it could have been a big challenegd but online learing was really well-organised. It was difficult to get used to and it was a lot harder this year to achieve the same grades as previous years because the learning had to be self directed and self-motivated.

Left to right: Eliza Cane-Honeysett, Genevieve Howell, Tabitha McCulloch and Eden Wolfe-Naughton

Tabitha McCulloch

Achieved A* grades in Biology, Chemistry and Maths and is going on to study Medicine at Cambridge.

She said: ‘This year has taken a lot more drive and motivation to keep going especially when you’ve had so many exams.

‘The school made it as easy for us as possible in some very difficult circumstances and in a way it has been harder because you have to keep at it – there’s been no slacking off at all.

‘I’m delighted with making the grades I needed to go and study Medicine and and I can now finally relax for a month or so before I go to Cambridge.’

GREAT BRITAIN WATER POLO PLAYER

Liv Henderson

Liv has managed to balance her schoolwork with also playing water polo for Great Britain often travelling to Manchester frequently to train with the squad.

Eventually she want to go on to Sandhurst and train as an Army officer but in the meantime, Liv, who was awarded three A*s in Economics, Business and Geography will be going to Manchester University where she will study Geography.

She said: ‘It is a skill balancing work and sport but the school has been so helpful. It is pretty tough as I’m used to training five times a week but with Covid I had a lot more time to train locally.

‘The school has been completely amazing. Every time I’ve been in school I’ve been so grateful for what we have here.’

She said: ‘I’m really looking forward to going to Manchester – it’s such a great city.’

Liv Henderson has managed to balance her schoolwork with also playing water polo for Great Britain often travelling to Manchester frequently to train with the squad

THE OPERA SINGER

Keen opera singer Amelie Samarasinghe is not going to study music but is going on to study Combined Social Sciences at Durham University after achieving A* grades in English Literature, History and Music and an A* in her EPQ.

But she already has a career as an opera singer just waiting in the wings having already preformed at the famous Glyndebourne when she was around 16 years of age.

‘I love it,’ she said: ‘It’s a big passion with me and I will definitely continue the singing at Durham University.

‘I was in a youth opera at Glyndebourne a couple of years back and it was an incredible experience. We were in a production called Belongings about the refugee crisis and I really enjoyed the experience.’

She praised the school for providing pupils with such a network of support.

‘I’ve been able to adapt to online studying so I feel I’ve been very lucky really. The support was amazing.

Musicians Katarina Henderson (back) and Amelie Samarasinghe, students at Roedean School

Source: Read Full Article