Paper rises in price by 23% as bakers warn bread could cost nearly £3

Now the price of toilet rolls and bread soars: Paper has fewer sheets and rises in price by 23% as bakers warn bread could cost nearly £3 as inflation bites

  • Soaring energy bills have resulted in a huge jump in the price of toilet paper
  • Loo roll is fastest-rising non-food item in supermarkets aside from kitchen roll
  • Ocado is now charging £1.24, a 23% rise, while Iceland has increased price 21%
  • It comes as baker says bread, another household staple, could rise to nearly £3

Toilet roll prices have risen 23 per cent and bread could soon cost nearly £3 as suppliers pass the impact of soaring energy costs and inflation to consumers.

Rising energy bills have resulted in a huge jump in the price of loo paper, despite rolls now being eight per cent shorter, new research has revealed.

Toilet roll is now the fastest-rising non-food item in supermarkets with the exception of kitchen roll, with Ocado charging 23 per cent more – equivalent to a £1.24 hike.

Iceland has also increased its toilet roll prices by 21 per cent, up to £1.07, as UK households face a surge in the cost of the supermarket weekly shop, The Telegraph reports.

Meanwhile, Aldi has imposed the lowest increase at just 3.4 per cent, analysis from Trolley has revealed. 

Paper mills, which produce toilet rolls, consume vast amounts of energy and have been severely impacted by rising electric and gas bills this year.

And the price of loo paper could surge further yet, with wholesale tissues having risen to an all-time high of £1,000 per ton – up from under £900 in January 2021. 

The rise in the price of toilet roll fast outpaces that of the consumer prices index,  which last month soared to another 40-year high.

The headline CPI rate reached 10.1 per cent in July, ell above analysts’ predictions of 9.8 per cent. It was up from 9.4 per cent the previous month, driven largely by fuel and food prices.

It comes as bread, another household staple, could rise to nearly £3 if suppliers pass rising costs onto consumers.

Andrew Chisholm, who runs Christie the Baker, which operates multiple shops in Scotland, said he can no longer calculate day to day costings because ‘everything is going up so often’.

He told MailOnline that, while he has kept prices as low as possible, to remain viable he would need to raise the price of his bread from £1.36 to £2.88 following a 600 per cent increase in his gas bills. 

Andrew Chisholm, who runs Christie the Baker, which operates multiple shops in Scotland, said 

He added: ‘We are a very traditional business in the community. We do not usually do price increases. 

‘We find that we are much cheaper because we are here for the community, but in the last 18 months, we have had no choice but to put our prices up.

‘Normally we do this about once a year, but we have had to do it three or four times.

‘Our best selling products are pies and breads, but they have had to go up 30 per cent. I cannot do a day to day costing because everything is going up so often. We are a bakery, so we use a lot of energy – our ovens are on 12 hours a day.

‘It has been a massive increase. We are all doomed. We need some help to remain open and it is the same for every business. 

‘We won’t be here in six months if something is not done. My electricity is up 200 per cent and my gas is up 600 per cent. It is desperate.’

It comes as supermarket shoppers already facing a cost-of-living crunch are paying up to 20 per cent more for cupboard staples including butter, milk and spaghetti, than they were last year.

With Britons already facing a double whammy of high fuel and rising energy prices, analysis by MailOnline revealed last week how a four-pint milk carton now costs, on average, 34p more than it did 12 months ago.

The cost of an average 500g pack of own-brand spaghetti has also rocketed up by 33p – from 52p to 85p – since August last year, while a 500g pack of Lurpak is now 63p more expensive – up from £3.58 last year to £4.21 this year.

The headline CPI rate reached 10.1 per cent in July – well above analysts’ predictions of 9.8 per cent. It was up from 9.4 per cent the previous month

Supermarkets are also facing a backlash from customers over the cost of baked bean. An average six-pack of Heinz baked beans now costs as much as £5 in some stores. A single 450g can will now, on average, set shoppers back £1.20 – up more than 37p in 12 months

Shop price annual inflation has surged to 5.1 per cent, up from 4.4 per cent in July, marking a new record since the British Retail Consortium (BRC) and NielsenIQ index started in 2005.

Meanwhile, food prices leapt by 9.3 per cent after a 7.0 per cent increase in July, driven by increases in products such as milk, margarine and crisps, with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine pushing up the costs of animal feed, fertiliser, wheat and vegetable oils, the BRC said.

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