Russia-Ukraine war LIVE: Putin's puppets DENY responsibility for food shortages & blames crisis on Western sanctions | The Sun

VLADIMIR Putin's Kremlin puppets DENIES responsibility over an emerging global food shortage – and claimed the West was to blame.

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday the onus was on Ukraine to solve the problem of resuming grain shipments by de-mining its ports.

Lavrov said no action was required on the Russian side because it had already made the necessary commitments.

"We state daily that we're ready to guarantee the safety of vessels leaving Ukrainian ports and heading for the (Bosphorus) gulf, we're ready to do that in cooperation with our Turkish colleagues," he said after talks with his Turkish counterpart.

"To solve the problem, the only thing needed is for the Ukrainians to let vessels out of their ports, either by demining them or by marking out safe corridors, nothing more is required."

Ukraine is one of the world's biggest exporters of grain, and Western countries have accused Russia of creating the risk of global famine by shutting Ukraine's Black Sea ports. Moscow denies responsibility for the international food crisis, blaming Western sanctions.

Lavrov said the main problem was that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy had "categorically refused" to resolve the problem of the mined ports.

"If they've now changed their position, then on our side there are no complications, let's see how the preliminary agreements we discussed yesterday and today can be put into practice."

Read our Ukraine war live blog below for the latest news & updates…

  • Joseph Gamp

    Russia DENIES responsibility for global food crisis

     Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday the onus was on Ukraine to solve the problem of resuming grain shipments by de-mining its ports.

    Lavrov said no action was required on the Russian side because it had already made the necessary commitments.

    "We state daily that we're ready to guarantee the safety of vessels leaving Ukrainian ports and heading for the (Bosphorus) gulf, we're ready to do that in cooperation with our Turkish colleagues," he said after talks with his Turkish counterpart.

    "To solve the problem, the only thing needed is for the Ukrainians to let vessels out of their ports, either by demining them or by marking out safe corridors, nothing more is required."

    Ukraine is one of the world's biggest exporters of grain, and Western countries have accused Russia of creating the risk of global famine by shutting Ukraine's Black Sea ports.

    Moscow denies responsibility for the international food crisis, blaming Western sanctions.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Ukraine files eight new war crimes cases against Russia

    Ukraine has filed eight more war crimes cases to court in addition to three sentences already handed down to Russian soldiers, Ukraine's Prosecutor General Iryna Venediktova said on Wednesday.

    Ukraine has opened more than 16,000 investigations into possible war crimes during Russia's invasion which began on Feb. 24, she said on television.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Russia won't take advantage if Kyiv lets grain shipments leave safely

    Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday said Moscow would not use the situation surrounding grain shipments in and around the Black Sea to advance its "special military operation", as long as Ukraine lets ships leave safely.

    "These are guarantees from the president of Russia," Lavrov said.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Russia says Ukraine needs to de-mine ports to allow grain shipments

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Wednesday said he hoped issues relating to grain shipments from ports in Ukraine could be resolved, provided Kyiv de-mines the waters around them.

    Speaking alongside his Turkish counterpart Mevlut Cavusoglu in Ankara, Lavrov said Russia's "special military operation" in Ukraine was going according to plan and that peace talks would need to resume before there was any chance of presidential talks between Vladimir Putin and Ukraine's Volodymyr Zelenskyy. 

  • Joseph Gamp

    US bans purchasing of Russian debt or stocks

    The US treasury department has banned buying any Russian debt or stocks belonging to Russian firms is under sanctions.

    This further tightens the curbs on the country following its invasion of Ukraine. 

    “Consistent with our goal to deny Russia the financial resources it needs to continue its brutal war against Ukraine, Treasury has made clear that US persons are prohibited from making new investments in the success of Russia, including through purchases on the secondary market,” a spokesperson said.

  • Joseph Gamp

    In pictures: Ukrainian troops destroy Russian ammo warehouse

    An attack was carried out by members of the 44th Artillery Brigade of the Ukrainian Ground Forces with the support of aerial reconnaissance by the 81st Airmobile Brigade of the Ukrainian Air Assault Forces.

    The brigade said on 8th June: “Artillerymen of the 44th OAbr of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, with the support of aerial reconnaissance of the 81st brigade of the 5th BTGR, bombed the accumulation of enemy equipment and ammunition in the Pologovsky district.

    “It is known that Russian troops fired at three settlements in the Pologovsky district. Enemy shells hit Gulyaipole, the villages of Dobropolye and Upper Tersa.

    “Earlier, the Russian military left some positions in the Melitopol and Vasilyevsky regions. As it became known, they moved in the direction of Kherson region.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Russia turns over bodies of 210 Ukrainian fighters killed in Mariupol

    Ukraine's military intelligence agency says Russia has so far turned over the bodies of 210 Ukrainian fighters killed in the battle for Mariupol. It says most of them were among the last holdouts in the Azovstal steelworks.

    The agency did not specify Tuesday how many more bodies are believed to remain in the rubble of the plant.

    Russia now controls the destroyed port city. It began turning over bodies last week. Ukraine said Saturday that the two sides had exchanged 320 bodies, with each getting back 160. It is unclear whether any more bodies have been given to Russia.

    The Ukrainian fighters defended the steelworks for nearly three months before surrendering in May under relentless Russian attacks from the ground, sea and air.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Russia claims advances in Ukraine amid fierce fighting

    Russia on Tuesday claimed to have taken control of 97% of one of the two provinces that make up Ukraine's Donbas, bringing the Kremlin closer to its goal of fully capturing the eastern industrial heartland of coal mines and factories.

    Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said Moscow's forces hold nearly all of Luhansk province. And it appears that Russia now occupies roughly half of Donetsk province, according to Ukrainian officials and military analysts.

    After abandoning its bungled attempt to storm Kyiv two months ago, Russia declared that taking the entire Donbas is its main objective. Moscow-backed separatists have been battling Ukrainian government forces in the Donbas since 2014, and the region has borne the brunt of the Russian onslaught in recent weeks.

    Early in the war, Russian troops also took control of the entire Kherson region and a large part of the Zaporizhzhia region, both in the south. Russian officials and their local appointees have talked about plans for those regions to either declare their independence or be folded into Russia.

    But in what may be the latest instance of anti-Russian sabotage inside Ukraine, Russian state media said Tuesday that an explosion at a cafe in the city of Kherson wounded four people. Tass called the apparent bombing in the Russian-occupied city a terror act.

    Before the Feb. 24 invasion, Ukrainian officials said Russia controlled some 7% of the country, including the Crimean Peninsula, which Russia annexed in 2014, and areas held by the separatists in Donetsk and Luhansk. Last week, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said Russian forces hold 20% of the country.

    While Russia has superior firepower, the Ukrainian defenders are entrenched and have shown the ability to counterattack.

    Zelenskyy said Russian forces made no significant advances in the eastern Donbas region over the past day.

  • Milica Cosic

    Zelensky: Stalemate with Russia ‘not an option’

    A stalemate with Russia is “not an option”, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky told Britain’s Financial Times newspaper yesterday, reiterating a plea for foreign help in the war.

    Ukraine’s fierce resistance of Russia’s all-out invasion of its neighbour led to a stalemate in parts of the country, with Moscow subsequently re-focussing its forces in the east.

    “Victory must be achieved on the battlefield”, he said as he repeated his call for Western military support.

    “We are inferior in terms of equipment and therefore we are not capable of advancing,” he told the paper. “We are going to suffer more losses and people are my priority.”

    Asked what Ukraine would consider a victory, Zelensky said restoring the borders Ukraine controlled before Russia’s invasion on February 24 would be “a serious temporary victory”.

    But he said the ultimate aim was the “full de-occupation of our entire territory”.

  • Milica Cosic

    UK calls for investigation into alleged Ukraine grain theft by Russia

    Allegations that Russia is stealing grain from a wide variety of areas in Ukraine must be investigated immediately, British farming minister Victoria Prentis has said yesterday.

    Prentis, speaking at an International Grains Council (IGC) conference in London, said she had heard allegations of grain theft by Russia first-hand from sources in the Kherson region in south Ukraine.

    World food prices have soared to record levels since Russia invaded Ukraine.

    And, Black Sea ports in Ukraine, have been blocked since the invasion – with some 20 million tonnes of grain stuck in the country at present.

    Russia has previously denied allegations of stealing wheat from Ukraine

  • Milica Cosic

    Putin loses his 50TH COLONEL

    VLADIMIR Putin has lost his 50th colonel in Ukraine – just one day after two of his generals were wiped out in the same ambush.

    Lieutenant Colonel Vladimir Nigmatullin, 46, was killed on May 31 – but his death was only disclosed by Russian forces on Tuesday. 

    It's not clear how the father-of-three from Yekaterinburg died.

    His sister-in-law Marina Konyukhova paid tribute to him on social media, describing him as an "amazing husband" to her sister.

    She said: "I am always proud of you, and I will always be proud. 

    "You set an example to the Motherland, so that everyone does like you did… you went through a lot of conflict areas."

    Putin has lost nearly one colonel every two days in the shambolic Ukraine invasion, bringing the tally to 50.

  • Milica Cosic

    Zelensky: Ukraine will fight for all territory amid fierce battle in east

    Ukraine will fight to recover all its territory occupied by Russian forces, President Volodymyr Zelensky said Tuesday, as his troops struggled to hold their ground in bloody street-to-street fighting in the city of Sievierodonetsk.

    “We have already lost too many people to simply cede our territory,” Zelenskiy said by video link at an event hosted by Britain’s Financial Times newspaper.

    “We have to achieve a full de-occupation of our entire territory.”

    Zelensky’s remarks responded forcefully to suggestions that Ukraine must cede territory to Russia to end the war.

    The governor of the Luhansk region, Serhiy Gaidai, said the defenders were finding it hard to repel Russian attacks in the centre of Sievierodonetsk, a small industrial city in the east.

    “The Russians are trying with all their might to capture Sievierodonetsk and cut off the highway from Lysychansk to Bakhmut,” he said in an online post.

    “In the regional centre it is hard to stave off the attacks, but the occupiers do not control the town.”

  • Milica Cosic

    Chornobyl radiation detectors back online & levels normal 

    Radiation detectors in the Exclusion Zone around Ukraine's defunct Chornobyl nuclear power plant are back online for the first time since Russia seized the area on Feb. 24, and radiation levels are normal, the U.N. nuclear watchdog said today, report Reuters.

    "Most of the 39 detectors sending data from the Exclusion Zone … are now visible on the IRMIS (International Radiation Monitoring Information System) map," the International Atomic Energy Agency said in a statement.

    "The measurements received so far indicated radiation levels in line with those measured before the conflict."

  • Milica Cosic

    Former Russian president lashes out at those who 'hate' Russia

    Dmitry Medvedev, Russia's former president who served between 2008 and 2012, has lashed out at those who “hate” Russia – calling them “degenerates” and vowing to “make them disappear”.

    Medvedev, who is now deputy head of the Security Council, wrote on Telegram: "I am often asked why my Telegram posts are so harsh. The answer is I hate them. They are bastards and degenerates.

    "They want death for us, Russia. And while I’m alive, I will do everything to make them disappear."

    However, he did not say nor specify who “they” were.

  • Milica Cosic

    US bans purchasing Russian debt or stocks in sanctions

    The US treasury department has banned buying any Russian debt or stocks belonging to Russian firms is under sanctions.

    This further tightens the curbs on the country following its invasion of Ukraine. 

    "Consistent with our goal to deny Russia the financial resources it needs to continue its brutal war against Ukraine, Treasury has made clear that US persons are prohibited from making new investments in the success of Russia, including through purchases on the secondary market," a spokesperson said.

  • Milica Cosic

    The Ukrainians forced to flee to Russia

    Some residents of the devastated Ukrainian city of Mariupol who managed to escape are saying they were given no choice but to travel to Russia in what the Kyiv government regards as "deportations".

    After spending weeks in a Mariupol basement and following the death of her father, who was killed in a rocket attack, Tetyana decided to leave her city to try to save her nine-year-old daughter.

    With no mobile network or any possibility of communicating, she took advantage of a lull in the shelling to go to an assembly point arranged by pro-Russian authorities to find out about exit routes.

    There, she was told going to Russia was the only option.

    "We were in shock. We did not want to go to Russia," the 38-year-old accountant said on the phone from Riga in Latvia where she has since sought refuge with her family.

    "How can you go to a country that wants to kill you?"

    For several weeks, Ukrainian authorities have been accusing Moscow of "illegally transferring" more than a million Ukrainians to Russia or to the parts of Ukraine currently controlled by Russian forces.

    Some civilians have indeed been forced to go towards Russia because travel to Ukrainian-held areas was blocked by fighting.

    Speaking to AFP after crossing from Russia into Estonia, Yelyzaveta, originally from Izyum, a city in the east currently held by Russian forces, said this was the case for her.

    "It was impossible to go towards Ukraine," Yelyzaveta told AFP.

    Firefighters extinguish a fire at a warehouse following recent shelling during Ukraine-Russia conflict in Donetsk, Ukraine June 6, 2022. REUTERS/Alexander ErmochenkoCredit: Reuters
    A family reunification takes place on the outskirts of Kharkiv, Ukraine May 30, 2022. Picture taken May 30, 2022. REUTERS/Ivan AlvaradoCredit: Reuters
    People fleeing from heavy shelling board an evacuation train at Pokrovsk train station, in Pokrovsk, eastern Ukraine, Sunday, May 22, 2022. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)Credit: AP
  • Milica Cosic

    Russia court orders arrest of critical sci-fi writer

    A Russian court yesterday ordered the arrest in absentia of science fiction writer Dmitry Glukhovsky – who faces up to 10 years in prison for criticism of Moscow's military campaign in Ukraine.

    The 42-year-old, who is believed to be abroad, has spoken out against the offensive in posts on social media and opinion pieces for Western media.

    Glukhovsky said today he was being accused of discrediting the Russian army on Instagram and blaming President Vladimir Putin for the offensive in Ukraine.

    "I am being accused of discrediting the Russian armed forces for a post on Instagram," he said on messaging app Telegram.

    "I am ready to repeat everything that was said there: 'Stop the war! Admit that this is a war against the entire nation and stop it!"

    The interior ministry put the author of Metro 2033 – a 2002 post-apocalyptic fiction novel – on a wanted list.

    Moscow's Basmanny district court ordered Glukhovsky's arrest in absentia.

    Russia is seeing an unprecedented crackdown on the opposition and dissenting voices.

  • Milica Cosic

    Ukraine will fight for all territory as stalemate 'not an option'

    Ukraine will fight to recover all its territory occupied by Russian forces, President Volodymyr Zelensky said today, as his troops battled street-to-street in Sievierodonetsk in one of the bloodiest land battles of the war.

    "We have already lost too many people to simply cede our territory," he said by video link at an event hosted by Britain's Financial Times newspaper.

    Stalemate was "not an option", he said. "We have to achieve a full deoccupation of our entire territory."

    Zelensky's remarks were a forceful response to suggestions that Ukraine must cede territory to Russia to end the war – now in its fourth month.

  • Milica Cosic

    Russian parliament votes to exit European Court of Human Rights

    The Russian State Duma today passed a pair of bills ending the European Court of Human Rights jurisdiction in Russia, after Russia announced plans to exit the court amid the conflict in Ukraine.

    The Russian parliament approved two bills, one removing the country from the courts jurisdiction and a second setting March 15 as the cut-off point, with rulings against Russia made after that date not to be implemented.

  • Milica Cosic

    Chornobyl radiation detectors back online & levels normal 

    Radiation detectors in the Exclusion Zone around Ukraine's defunct Chornobyl nuclear power plant are back online for the first time since Russia seized the area on Feb. 24, and radiation levels are normal, the U.N. nuclear watchdog said today, report Reuters.

    "Most of the 39 detectors sending data from the Exclusion Zone … are now visible on the IRMIS (International Radiation Monitoring Information System) map," the International Atomic Energy Agency said in a statement.

    "The measurements received so far indicated radiation levels in line with those measured before the conflict."

  • Milica Cosic

    Zelensky: Stalemate with Russia 'not an option'

    A stalemate with Russia is "not an option", Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky told Britain's Financial Times newspaper today, reiterating a plea for foreign help in the war.

    Ukraine's fierce resistance of Russia's all-out invasion of its neighbour led to a stalemate in parts of the country, with Moscow subsequently re-focussing its forces in the east.

    "Victory must be achieved on the battlefield", he said as he repeated his call for Western military support.

    "We are inferior in terms of equipment and therefore we are not capable of advancing," he told the paper. "We are going to suffer more losses and people are my priority."

    Asked what Ukraine would consider a victory, Zelensky said restoring the borders Ukraine controlled before Russia's invasion on February 24 would be "a serious temporary victory".

    But he said the ultimate aim was the "full de-occupation of our entire territory".

  • Milica Cosic

    Zelensky: Ukraine will fight for all territory amid fierce battle in east

    Ukraine will fight to recover all its territory occupied by Russian forces, President Volodymyr Zelensky said today, as his troops struggled to hold their ground in bloody street-to-street fighting in the city of Sievierodonetsk.

    "We have already lost too many people to simply cede our territory," Zelenskiy said by video link at an event hosted by Britain's Financial Times newspaper.

    "We have to achieve a full de-occupation of our entire territory."

    Zelensky's remarks responded forcefully to suggestions that Ukraine must cede territory to Russia to end the war.

    The governor of the Luhansk region, Serhiy Gaidai, said the defenders were finding it hard to repel Russian attacks in the centre of Sievierodonetsk, a small industrial city in the east.

    "The Russians are trying with all their might to capture Sievierodonetsk and cut off the highway from Lysychansk to Bakhmut," he said in an online post.

    "In the regional centre it is hard to stave off the attacks, but the occupiers do not control the town."

  • Milica Cosic

    Former Russian president lashes out at those who 'hate' Russia

    Dmitry Medvedev, Russia's former president who served between 2008 and 2012, has lashed out at those who “hate” Russia – calling them “degenerates” and vowing to “make them disappear”.

    Medvedev, who is now deputy head of the Security Council, wrote on Telegram: "I am often asked why my Telegram posts are so harsh. The answer is I hate them. They are bastards and degenerates.

    "They want death for us, Russia. And while I’m alive, I will do everything to make them disappear."

    However, he did not say nor specify who “they” were.

  • Milica Cosic

    Putin loses his 50TH COLONEL

    VLADIMIR Putin has lost his 50th colonel in Ukraine – just one day after two of his generals were wiped out in the same ambush.

    Lieutenant Colonel Vladimir Nigmatullin, 46, was killed on May 31 – but his death was only disclosed by Russian forces today. 

    It's not clear how the father-of-three from Yekaterinburg died.

    His sister-in-law Marina Konyukhova paid tribute to him on social media, describing him as an "amazing husband" to her sister.

    She said: "I am always proud of you, and I will always be proud. 

    "You set an example to the Motherland, so that everyone does like you did… you went through a lot of conflict areas."

    Putin has lost nearly one colonel every two days in the shambolic Ukraine invasion, bringing the tally to 50.

  • Milica Cosic

    Horror footage shows Russian troops being blown up by booby-trap

    HORRIFYING footage has shown Russian troops being blown up by booby-trap explosives as fighting rages in hell-on-Earth Donbas.

    The video reveals the moment Ukrainian soldiers wiped out a group of Russian troops in Marinka after branding Vladimir Putin's army "uninvited tourists" in the region of eastern Ukraine.

    The footage was shared by the K-2 Battle Group, part of the 54th Mechanized Brigade, who have been fighting in the Donbas since 2014.

    The troops said: "We continue to show the voyage of uninvited 'tourists' on foot through the streets of Marinka, in the Donetsk region.

    "A crowd of 'tourists' walked by looking around, but they did not see the surprise on the road, which was set by the guys from the reconnaissance group K2 with the help of the no-less-famous 'construction' brigade.

    "The surprise worked and the uninvited 'tourists' did not like it…"

    The heroic troops signed off the footage of the deadly trap with the now famous slogan "Slava Ukraini" – which means "Glory to Ukraine" in English.

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