Women hikers throw fight gender stereotypes as they climb Scafell Pike

Women hikers throw the kitchen sink at gender stereotypes as they climb Scafell Pike with washing stations attached to their backs in fight for equality

  •  Emma Woodhall, 36, April Wilson, 40, and  Zena Clark, 40, hiked Scafell Pike
  • The trio scaled England’s highest peak of 978m with sinks tied to their backs 
  • They did it to raise money for North East domestic abuse charity Harbour
  • The sinks were painted with  misogynitisc slurs and sexist comments all over

It would certainly be brave – not to mention inflammatory – to suggest today that a woman’s place is in the kitchen.

But that doesn’t mean the fight for equality is over, as these charity campaigners would agree. They scaled England’s highest peak with sinks tied to their backs to raise money for North East domestic abuse charity Harbour.

Teachers Emma Woodhall, 36, of Co Durham, and April Wilson, 40, and dental nurse Zena Clark, 40, hiked Scafell Pike with heavy metal sinks tied to their backs Pictured: L-R Zena Clark, 40, Emma Woodhall, 36, April Wilson, 40

Teachers Emma Woodhall, 36, of Co Durham, and April Wilson, 40, and dental nurse Zena Clark, 40, hiked Scafell Pike ‘to alleviate the stigma that women should be ‘chained to the kitchen sink’.

The trio spray-painted the sinks and daubed them with misogynistic slurs they wanted to challenge.

Harbour works with families and individuals who are affected by abuse. The team has raised £340 on JustGiving so far.

Source: Read Full Article